See also: South and souð
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 South (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English south, from Old English sūþ, from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą. Compare West Frisian súd, Dutch zuid, German Süd, Danish syd.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

south (uncountable)

  1. One of the four major compass points, specifically 180°, directed toward the South Pole, and conventionally downwards on a map, abbreviated as S.
  2. The southern region or area; the inhabitants thereof. [circa 1300]
    • 1996, Andrew W. Conrad, Alma Rubal-Lopez, Post-Imperial English: Status Change in Former British and American Colonies, 1940-1990, Walter de Gruyter (→ISBN), page 343:
      Just before independence (in 1955) the military garrison in the south rebelled and that was the beginning of a civil war between the north and the south ...
    • 2014, Fanar Haddad, Sectarianism in Iraq: Antagonistic Visions of Unity, Oxford University Press (→ISBN), page 131:
      What was said [prior to 2003] is that the south rebelled. Even then; rebelled? What rebelled? Who was supporting Saddam other than the people of the south?
    • 2019, Allan Thompson, Media and Mass Atrocity: The Rwanda Genocide and Beyond, McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP (→ISBN), page 322:
      When Nimeiri ended that autonomy in 1983, the south took up arms. This Second Sudanese Civil War ended only after four years of formal talks []
  3. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (ecclesiastical) In a church: the direction to the right-hand side of a person facing the altar.
    • 1998, Leonel L. Mitchell, Pastoral and Occasional Liturgies: A Ceremonial Guide, Rowman & Littlefield (→ISBN), page 49:
      If candidates stand on the liturgical south facing the presider and liturgical assistants on the liturgical north, it will present better visual lines for the congregation than if they stand facing east and west with their backs toward the congregation.
    • 2002, John L. Hooker, In the Shadows of Holy Week: The Office of Tenebrae, Church Publishing, Inc. (→ISBN):
      It is to be situated in the chancel on the right (i.e., liturgical south) side of the church.
    • 2009, Carol Mary Richardson, Reclaiming Rome: Cardinals in the Fifteenth Century, BRILL (→ISBN), page 389:
      It was moved from its original location in 1507 hardly a decade after it was completed, to the bottom of the liturgical south aisle along with the free-standing chapel of the relic of the lance.
    • 2014, Paul Porwoll, Against All Odds: History of Saint Andrew's Parish Church, Charleston, 1706-2013, WestBow Press (→ISBN), page 365:
      [] Throughout the book I refer directionally to the altar and chancel of St. Andrew's as situated at ecclesiastical east (to avoid overcomplicating matters), not geographical or magnetic southeast. Thus, [] The north side faces the river (beyond the subdivision behind the church), and the south side, Ashley River Road. [] The pulpit and reading desk are at ecclesiastical northeast, and the organ pipes and 1706 memorial at ecclesiastical south. At St. Andrew's, ecclesiastical north, south, east, and west correspond to geographical northeast, southwest, southeast, and northwest. Unless otherwise indicated, compass directions given in this book are ecclesiastical, not geographical, reference points.
    • 2017, Cameron Macdonell, Ghost Storeys: Ralph Adams Cram, Modern Gothic Media, and Deconstructive Microhistory at a Canadian Church, McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP (→ISBN):
      The new St Mary's Anglican Church, Walkerville, has an attached rectory flanking to the liturgical south and an attached parish hall flanking to the liturgical north, both half-timbered in the Tudor Revival style. [Referring to a church that is oriented SSE, making "south" WSW]

Coordinate termsEdit

northwest north northeast
west   east
southwest south southeast


Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Also see Appendix:Cardinal directions for translations of all compass points

AdjectiveEdit

south (not comparable)

  1. Toward the south; southward.
  2. (meteorology, of wind) from the south.
  3. Of or pertaining to the south; southern.
  4. Pertaining to the part of a corridor used by southbound traffic.
    south highway 1
  5. (ecclesiastical) Designating, or situated in, the liturgical south.
    • 2014, Paul Porwoll, Against All Odds: History of Saint Andrew's Parish Church, Charleston, 1706-2013, WestBow Press (→ISBN), page 365:
      Throughout the book I refer directionally to the altar and chancel of St. Andrew's as situated at ecclesiastical east (to avoid overcomplicating matters), not geographical or magnetic southeast. Thus, [] The north side faces the river (beyond the subdivision behind the church), and the south side, Ashley River Road.

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from south (adjective)

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

south (not comparable)

  1. Toward the south; southward.
  2. Downward.
  3. In an adverse direction or trend (go south).
  4. (meteorology) Of wind, from the south.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

south (third-person singular simple present souths, present participle southing, simple past and past participle southed)

  1. To turn or move toward the south; to veer toward the south.
  2. (astronomy) To come to the meridian; to cross the north and south line.
    The moon souths at nine.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English sūþ, in turn from Proto-Germanic *sunþrą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

south

  1. south, southernness
  2. A location to the south; the south
  3. The south wind

Coordinate termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: south
  • Scots: sooth
  • Yola: zouth

ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

south

  1. south, southern
  2. At the south

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

south

  1. To the south, southwards, southbound
  2. From the south, southern
  3. In the south

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit