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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek μέσον (méson, middle).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

meson (plural mesons)

  1. (rare outside entomology) The mesial plane dividing the body into similar right and left halves.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From meso- +‎ on. Coined by Indian physicist Homi Bhabha in 1939, as a modification of the earlier suggestion mesotron.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmiː.zɒn/, /ˈmiː.sɒn/

NounEdit

meson (plural mesons)

  1. (obsolete) A member of a group of subatomic particles having a mass intermediate between electrons and protons. (The most easily detected mesons fit this definition.)
  2. (now specifically, physics) An elementary particle that is composed of a quark and an antiquark, such as a kaon or pion. (Mesons composed of rarer quarks are much heavier.)
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

 
Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

meson n (plural mesonen)

  1. (physics) meson

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

meson

  1. accusative singular of meso

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

meson m (plural mesons)

  1. Alternative spelling of méson

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mansiō, mansiōnem (abode, home, dwelling).

NounEdit

meson f (oblique plural mesons, nominative singular meson, nominative plural mesons)

  1. house

DescendantsEdit

  • French: maison