See also: Meum

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mēum (Meum athamanticum), from Ancient Greek μῆον (mêon), probably from μεῖον (meîon, lesser) for its small size.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈmiːəm/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈmi.əm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːəm

NounEdit

meum (uncountable)

  1. spignel, Meum athamanticum
    Synonyms: meon, meu, baldmoney, bearwort

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Translated by Pliny the Elder from Ancient Greek μῆον (mêon, Meum athamanticum), probably from μεῖον (meîon, lesser) for its small size.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mēum n (genitive mēī); second declension

  1. an umbelliferous plant, Meum athamanticum
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative mēum mēa
Genitive mēī mēōrum
Dative mēō mēīs
Accusative mēum mēa
Ablative mēō mēīs
Vocative mēum mēa
DescendantsEdit
  • English: meum
  • Middle French: meu (perhaps)
  • Translingual: Meum, Meum athamanticum

Etymology 2Edit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

meum

  1. inflection of meus:
    1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular
    2. accusative masculine singular
See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • meum”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • meum in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • (ambiguous) I am benefited by a thing: aliquid ad meum fructum redundat