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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to miration. Ultimately from Latin mīror (marvel at).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmaɪ.ɹeɪt/, /maɪˈɹeɪt/

VerbEdit

mirate (third-person singular simple present mirates, present participle mirating, simple past and past participle mirated)

  1. (Southern US, Midland US, uncommon) To marvel at. [since the late 1800s]
    • 1893, M.E.M. Davis, Judy's Mardi Gras, in Wide Awake:
      With Bud in her arms and Babe at her heels, she rushed from one part of the court to another, laughing boisterously at Paulo's monkey pranks, and "mirating" over Francesca's tawdry finery.
    • 1960, My Affair with a Weekly, published in The North Carolina Miscellany (2012, →ISBN), page 209:
      I should have sensed the waves of embarrassment she was radiating. But I didn't. I went right on “mirating” till I finally got around to saying they were “lovely.” Well, that was all my wife could take. “You've said enough,” she remarked, drily.
    • 1999, Reynolds Price, A Singular Family: Rosacoke and Her Kin (→ISBN), page 312:
      That paper-doll mother was still mirating at her own flesh and blood having lice. Rosacoke smiled and thought, "That is the one funny thing since Heywood Betts and his Honolulu shirt."

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AdverbEdit

mirate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of miri

ItalianEdit

LatinEdit