See also: Admire and admiré

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French admirer, from Latin admīror, from ad + mīror (wonder at).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

admire (third-person singular simple present admires, present participle admiring, simple past and past participle admired)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To be amazed at; to view with surprise; to marvel at.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 2, member 4:
      The poor fellow, admiring how he came there, was served in state all day long […].
    • 1640, Thomas Fuller, The Holy State
      examples rather to be admired than imitated
  2. (transitive) To regard with wonder and delight.
  3. (transitive) To look upon with an elevated feeling of pleasure, as something which calls out approbation, esteem, love or reverence.
  4. (transitive) To estimate or value highly; to hold in high esteem.
    to admire a person of high moral worth
    He had always admired the work ethos and family values of his friend.
    to admire a landscape
    • 2000, Marshall Mathers (Eminem) (lyrics and music), “The Way I Am”, in The Marshall Mathers LP:
      I'm so sick and tired of bein' admired. That I wish that I would just die or get fired.
  5. (US, dialectal, rare) To be enthusiastic about (doing something); to want or like (to do something). (Sometimes followed by to.)
    • 1953, Arthur Miller, The Crucible:
      I'm not sayin' she's touched the Devil, now, but I'd admire to know what books she reads and why she hides them — she'll not answer me, y' see.
    • 1976, Field & Stream, page 10:
      And I'd admire seeing this creek become a sort of stopping place for geese of one sort and another.
    • 2002, Jack Jones, Iron Spur (→ISBN), page 37:
      “I hope you do. I'd admire seeing a lot of you.” They made camp down at the creek. Will spread her blanket not too far from his. “Well, aren't you a lady's man.” “Why do you say that?”

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

    • IPA(key): /adˈmire/
    • Hyphenation: ad‧mi‧re
    • Rhymes: -ire

AdverbEdit

admire

  1. admiringly

FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

admire

  1. first-person singular present indicative of admirer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of admirer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of admirer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of admirer
  5. second-person singular imperative of admirer

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

admire

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of admirar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of admirar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of admirar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of admirar

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

admire

  1. third-person singular present subjunctive of admira
  2. third-person plural present subjunctive of admira

ScotsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

admire (third-person singular present admires, present participle admirin, past admired, past participle admired)

  1. to admire, marvel at
  2. to surprise, astonish

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /adˈmiɾe/, [aðˈmiɾe]

VerbEdit

admire

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of admirar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of admirar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of admirar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of admirar.