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See also: Morse and morsë

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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French mors, from Latin morsus (bite; clasp), from mordere (to bite).

NounEdit

morse (plural morses)

  1. A clasp or fastening used to fasten a cope in the front, usually decorative. [from 15th c.]
    • 1890, Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray, ch. XI:
      The morse bore a seraph's head in gold-thread raised work.

Etymology 2Edit

Origin uncertain. Compare Russian морж (morž, walrus), Sami morša, Finnish mursu (all attested later).

NounEdit

morse (plural morses)

  1. (now rare) A walrus. [from 15th c.]
    • 1880-1881: Clements R Markham (editor), The Voyages of William Baffin, 1612-1622:
      Then we passed through a great deale of small ice, and sawe, upon some peices, two morses, and upon some, one; and also diuers seales, layeing upon peices of ice.

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

AdverbEdit

morse

  1. never

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

morse

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of morsen

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Russian морж (morž), from Northern Sami.

NounEdit

morse m (plural morses)

  1. walrus
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

morse m (uncountable)

  1. Morse code

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

morse f

  1. plural of morsa

VerbEdit

morse

  1. third-person singular past historic of mordere

morse f

  1. plural of morso

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

morse

  1. vocative masculine singular of morsus

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English Morse, after the American inventor Samuel Morse.

NounEdit

morse m (definite singular morsen) (uncountable)

  1. Morse or Morse code

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

morse (imperative mors, present tense morser, simple past and past participle morsa or morset)

  1. (sende morse) to transmit Morse code
  2. to die

Usage notesEdit

Using morse to signify die instead of the more common is a special usage found among health workers. The use of the term in this way is unknown in the general population.

ReferencesEdit


SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Swedish morghoms. Related to morgon.

AdverbEdit

morse

  1. (following i + possibly further specifications) a past morning

Usage notesEdit

The word is never used on its own, but in various constructions which all begins by the preposition i. Without further specifications, it is taken to mean "the (already past) morning of today". Specifying the day gives following options:

And so on for Tuesday - Sunday. Note that the days of the weeks are always in genitive case.

A synonymous construction, which however is not restricted to past mornings, is to use på ... morgon(en):

  • på måndag morgon = (on) Monday morning (note: only in the future)
  • på måndagsmorgonen (on) the Monday morning (past or future)
  • But there is one exception: "tomorrow morning" is usually i morgon bitti (or less common i morgon på morgonen)