morning

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English morwening, equivalent to morn +‎ -ing. See also morrow, Middle English morwe.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

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morning (plural mornings)

  1. The part of the day from dawn to midday.
    • 1835, Sir John Ross, Sir James Clark Ross, Narrative of a Second Voyage in Search of a North-west Passage …, Volume 1, pp.284-5
      Towards the following morning, the thermometer fell to 5°; and at daylight, there was not an atom of water to be seen in any direction.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 4, The Celebrity:
      One morning I had been driven to the precarious refuge afforded by the steps of the inn, after rejecting offers from the Celebrity to join him in a variety of amusements. But even here I was not free from interruption, for he was seated on a horse-block below me, playing with a fox terrier.
  2. The part of the day after midnight and before midday: one o'clock in the morning = 0100 or 1 a.m.

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TranslationsEdit

InterjectionEdit

morning

  1. A greeting said in the morning; good morning

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Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 11:56