FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French mut, muet, from Old French mu, mut, mui, from Latin mūtus, of Proto-Indo-European origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /mɥɛ/, /my.ɛ/
  • (file)
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

muet (feminine muette, masculine plural muets, feminine plural muettes)

  1. dumb (unable to talk)
  2. silent, mute, unspeaking
  3. silent, unvoiced, unspoken
    Le et la deviennent l' devant une voyelle ou un « h » muet.
    Le and la become l' before a vowel or a silent "h".

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman muet; sometimes influenced by Latin mūtus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmiu̯ɛt/, /ˈmiu̯t/

AdjectiveEdit

muet

  1. Temporarily unable to speak (due to strong emotions or secrecy)
  2. (rare) Mute; unable to speak or incapable of speech.
  3. (rare) Silent; tending not to make noise.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: mute
  • Scots: mute

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mu, from Latin mūtus.

AdjectiveEdit

muet m

  1. (Jersey) mute

Derived termsEdit