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AlbanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Either from Proto-Albanian *mukta, from Proto-Indo-European *(s)mewk- (to release, let loose) (compare Sanskrit मुक्त (muktá, released)) or from Proto-Albanian *mut, from Proto-Indo-European *meu (wet; dirt; to wash). Compare Armenian մութ (mutʿ, dark), Middle Low German modder (mud), English mud.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

mut m

  1. (vulgar) shit

SynonymsEdit

See alsoEdit


AromanianEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mūtō. Compare Daco-Romanian muta, mut.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

mut (third-person singular present mutã, past participle mutatã)

  1. I move.
  2. I remove, displace.
  3. I raise.
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin mūtus. Compare Daco-Romanian mut.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

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mut (feminine mutã, masculine plural muts, feminine plural muti / mute)

  1. mute
Derived termsEdit

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan, from Latin mūtus, of Proto-Indo-European origin.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mut (feminine muda, masculine plural muts, feminine plural mudes)

  1. mute

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

mut m (plural muts, feminine muda)

  1. mute

Further readingEdit


ChuukeseEdit

VerbEdit

mut

  1. to allow

DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin modo. Compare regional Italian mo, compare Romanian măi.

AdverbEdit

mut

  1. now

Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

mut

  1. sullen, sulky

InflectionEdit

Inflection of mut
Positive Comparative Superlative
Common singular mut 2
Neuter singular mut 2
Plural mutte 2
Definite attributive1 mutte
1) When an adjective is applied predicatively to something definite, the corresponding "indefinite" form is used.
2) The "indefinite" superlatives may not be used attributively.

FinnishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

PronounEdit

mut

  1. (colloquial) Accusative form of .

See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

ConjunctionEdit

mut

  1. (coordinating, colloquial) but

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

mut

  1. third-person singular past historic of mouvoir

FriulianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūtus.

AdjectiveEdit

mut

  1. mute, dumb

See alsoEdit


IngrianEdit

ConjunctionEdit

mut

  1. but

LadinEdit

NounEdit

mut m (plural mutons)

  1. child

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French mu, mut, mui.

NounEdit

mut m (plural muts)

  1. mute (one who cannot speak)

AdjectiveEdit

mut m (feminine singular mute, masculine plural mutz, feminine plural mutes)

  1. mute (unable to speak)

DescendantsEdit


North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian mōta. Cognates include Mooring North Frisian mötj and West Frisian moatte.

VerbEdit

mut

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) must, have to

OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin mūtus.

AdjectiveEdit

mut m (feminine singular muda, masculine plural muts, feminine plural mudas)

  1. mute

Further readingEdit

  • Joan de Cantalausa (2006) Diccionari general occitan a partir dels parlars lengadocians, 2 edition, →ISBN, page 668.

RohingyaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Sanskrit मूत्र (mūtra).

NounEdit

mut

  1. urine

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin mūtus, of Proto-Indo-European origin.

AdjectiveEdit

mut m or n (feminine singular mută, masculine plural muți, feminine and neuter plural mute)

  1. dumb, mute
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

mut

  1. first-person singular present indicative of muta
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of muta

TzotzilEdit

NounEdit

mut (plural mutetik)

  1. (Zinacantán) bird