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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

numeric +‎ -al

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /n(j)uˈmɛɹɪkəl/

AdjectiveEdit

numerical (comparative more numerical, superlative most numerical)

  1. of or pertaining to numbers
    • 2013 July 9, Kehoe, Joselle DiNunzio, “Cognition, brains and Riemann”, in plus.maths.org[1], retrieved 2013-09-08:
      They propose that the brain manages numerical systems with circuitry that is equipped for action related to "more than-less than", "faster-slower", "nearer-farther", "bigger-smaller", computations of "any kind of stuff in the external world". This neural activity allows us to successfully reach, grasp, throw or point. Bueti and Walsh argue further that, "it is on these abilities that discrete numerical abilities hitched an evolutionary ride," given the primitive need to make these kinds of judgments of space and time. Number then, as a measure, is not primary — what comes first is our need to move accurately.
  2. (obsolete) The same in number; hence, identically the same; identical.
    • 1655, Fuller, Thomas, “Dedication”, in The Church History of Britain, volume 2, London: Thomas Tegg and Son, published 1837, page 3:
      But would to God that all my fellow-brethren, which with me bemoan the loss of their books, with me might rejoice for the recovery thereof, though not the same numerical volumes!
    • 1694 April 29, South, Robert, “Christianity Mysterious, and the Wisdom of God in Making it So: Proved in a Sermon Preached at Westminster Abbey”, in Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions, volume 2, Oxford: Oxford University Press, published 1842, page 189:
      For who ever was yet seen by them, after a total consumption into dust and ashes, to rise again, and to resume the same numerical body?

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