See also: Nutrition

English edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Middle French nutrition, from Old French nutricion, from Latin nutritio.

Pronunciation edit

  • (UK) enPR: nyo͞o-trĭʹ-shən, IPA(key): /njuːˈtɹɪ.ʃən/
  • (US) enPR: no͞o-trĭʹ-shən, IPA(key): /nuˈtɹɪ.ʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪʃən

Noun edit

nutrition (usually uncountable, plural nutritions)

  1. (biology) The organic process by which an organism assimilates food and uses it for growth and maintenance.
    • 1822, John Barclay, chapter I, in An Inquiry Into the Opinions, Ancient and Modern, Concerning Life and Organization[1], Edinburgh, London: Bell & Bradfute; Waugh & Innes; G. & W. B. Whittaker, section I, page 2:
      In the dead state all is apparently without motion. No agent within indicates design, intelligence, or foresight: there is no respiration; no digestion, circulation, or nutrition; […]
  2. That which nourishes; nutriment.
    I accidentally ate a worm which was in my apple - my uncle said the extra nutrition would do me good.

Derived terms edit

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Further reading edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin nūtrītiōnem, from Latin nūtriōnem.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

nutrition f (plural nutritions)

  1. nutrition

Related terms edit

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Interlingua edit

Noun edit

nutrition (uncountable)

  1. nutrition