Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From occidō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

occāsus m ‎(genitive occāsūs); fourth declension

  1. setting (of the sun etc.)
  2. west

InflectionEdit

Fourth declension.

Case Singular Plural
nominative occāsus occāsūs
genitive occāsūs occāsuum
dative occāsuī occāsibus
accusative occāsum occāsūs
ablative occāsū occāsibus
vocative occāsus occāsūs

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

occāsus m ‎(feminine occāsa, neuter occāsum); first/second declension

  1. setting
  2. western

InflectionEdit

First/second declension.

Number Singular Plural
Case / Gender Masculine Feminine Neuter Masculine Feminine Neuter
nominative occāsus occāsa occāsum occāsī occāsae occāsa
genitive occāsī occāsae occāsī occāsōrum occāsārum occāsōrum
dative occāsō occāsō occāsīs
accusative occāsum occāsam occāsum occāsōs occāsās occāsa
ablative occāsō occāsā occāsō occāsīs
vocative occāse occāsa occāsum occāsī occāsae occāsa

ReferencesEdit

  • occasus in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • occasus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • occasus in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • sunrise; sunset: ortus, occasus solis
    • (ambiguous) to be situate to the north-west: spectare inter occasum solis et septentriones
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