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See also: West

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English west, from Old English west, from Proto-Germanic *westrą. Cognate with Scots wast, Saterland Frisian Saterland Frisian Wääste, West Frisian west, Dutch west, German West, Danish vest. Cognate also with Old French west, French ouest, Spanish oeste, Catalan oest, Galician oeste, Italian ovest (all ultimately borrowings of the English word). Compare also Latin vesper.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

west (uncountable)

  1. One of the four principal compass points, specifically 270°, conventionally directed to the left on maps; the direction of the setting sun at an equinox, abbreviated as W.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Also see Appendix:Cardinal directions for translations of all compass points

AdjectiveEdit

west

  1. Situated or lying in or toward the west; westward.
  2. (meteorology) Of wind: from the west.
  3. Of or pertaining to the west; western.
  4. From the West; occidental.
  5. (ecclesiastial) Designating, or situated in, that part of a church which is opposite to, and farthest from, the east, or the part containing the chancel and choir.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AdverbEdit

west (not comparable)

  1. Towards the west; westwards.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

west (third-person singular simple present wests, present participle westing, simple past and past participle wested)

  1. To move to the west; (of the sun) to set. [from 15th c.]
    • 1596, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, V.prologue:
      Foure times his place he shifted hath in sight, / And twice has risen, where he now doth West, / And wested twice, where he ought rise aright.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Dutch west, from Proto-Germanic *westrą. Compare German West, English and West Frisian west, Danish vest.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

west

  1. (only in compounds) west
  2. westwards

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

noordwest noord noordoost
west   oost
zuidwest zuid zuidoost

ItalianEdit

NounEdit

west m (invariable)

  1. West (historic area of America)

KurdishEdit

NounEdit

west f

  1. act of tiring or getting tired

Derived termsEdit


Low GermanEdit

VerbEdit

west

  1. past participle of wesen

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English west, in turn from Proto-Germanic *westrą.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

west

  1. west (compass point)
  2. A location to the south; the south
  3. The west wind

Coordinate termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AdjectiveEdit

west

  1. west, western
  2. At the west

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AdverbEdit

west

  1. To the west, westards, westbound
  2. From the west, western
  3. In the west

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *westrą, whence also Old High German west, Old Norse vestr.

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

west

  1. west

DescendantsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old English west.

AdverbEdit

west

  1. west

DescendantsEdit