Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin unknown.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

old hat (uncountable)

  1. (idiomatic) Something with which one is very familiar; something very common, hackneyed or out of date. [from 20th c.]
    • 1946 November 11, “New Plays in Manhattan”, in Time[1]:
      Coward is such an old hand at this kind of thing that he makes it seem old hat.
    • 1987 May 8, Elaine Sciolino, “Washington Talk: The Hart Story Grips the Capital”, in New York Times[2]:
      It is old hat for a sex scandal to bring down a politician.
    • 2007 May 4, Fredrick Kunkle and Paul Duggan, Straining for a Glimpse of Royalty[3]:
      Based on the size of the crowd, perhaps the queen is old hat.
  2. (now rare, archaic) The vulva; (by extension) sexual intercourse.
    • 1723, Charles Walker, Memoirs of Sally Salisbury, letter XI:
      Upon which she very pertly reply'd, She had done that not with a Design to affront but to convince me of the Value she had for my Present; for that if the Pedantick Blockhead should come, he should only have a little bit of Old-Hat to stay his Stomach, till he got to some Harlot of his own Puritanical Flock []
    • 1980, Erica Jong, Fanny:
      'Tis a Nest, a Niche, an Old Hat, an Omnibus, an Oyster, a Palace o' Pleasure.

Related termsEdit