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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis (pertaining to compulsory feudal service, applied especially to mills, wells, ovens, etc., used in common by people of the lower classes, upon the command of a feudal superior; hence, common, commonplace), from bannum (command, proclamation). See also ban, abandon.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal (comparative more banal or banaler, superlative most banal or banalest)

  1. Common in a boring way, to the point of being predictable; containing nothing new or fresh.
    Synonyms: everyday, prosaic; see also Thesaurus:hackneyed, Thesaurus:boring
    Antonyms: new, original
    • 2013, Mark Ruffalo as Dan, Begin Again, written by John Carney:
      One of the most banal scenes is suddenly invested with so much meaning! All these banalities - They're suddenly turned into these… these beautiful, effervescent pearls. From Music.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

banal m

  1. bramble
  2. broom (a plant, sp. Genista)

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French banal.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal (masculine and feminine plural banals)

  1. banal (common in a boring way)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From ban +‎ -al, related to Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal (feminine singular banale, masculine plural banals, feminine plural banales)

  1. banal; commonplace

AdjectiveEdit

banal (feminine singular banale, masculine plural banaux, feminine plural banales)

  1. (law) public
  2. (historical) relating to facilities owned by feudal lords
    un four banal, un moulin banal
    a commonplace oven, a commonplace mill

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal (comparative banaler, superlative am banalsten)

  1. banal

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Malay banal, from Dutch banaal, from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

AdjectiveEdit

banal

  1. banal (common)

LuxembourgishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal (masculine banalen, neuter banaalt, comparative méi banal, superlative am banaalsten)

  1. banal

DeclensionEdit


MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch banaal, from French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal

  1. banal (common)
    Synonym: basi

PortugueseEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal m or f (plural banais, comparable)

  1. banal (common)
  2. hackneyed (repeated too often)
    Synonyms: batido, trivial

Derived termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French banal, from Medieval Latin bannalis, from bannum.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

banal (plural banales)

  1. banal

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


TagalogEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdjectiveEdit

banal

  1. pious