See also: HAT, hať, haț, hát, hät, hăț, hạt, and -hat

EnglishEdit

 hat on Wikipedia
 
A rabbi in a kolpik hat.

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hat, from Old English hæt (head-covering, hat), from Proto-Germanic *hattuz (hat), from Proto-Indo-European *kadʰ- (to guard, cover, care for, protect). Cognate with North Frisian hat (hat), Danish hat (hat), Swedish hatt (hat), Icelandic hattur (hat), Latin cassis (helmet), Lithuanian kudas (bird's crest or tuft), Avestan 𐬑𐬀𐬊𐬛𐬀(xaoda, hat), Persian خود(xud, helmet), Welsh caddu (to provide for, ensure). Compare also hood.

NounEdit

hat (plural hats)

  1. A covering for the head, often in the approximate form of a cone or a cylinder closed at its top end, and sometimes having a brim and other decoration.
  2. (figuratively) A particular role or capacity that a person might fill.
    • 1993, Susan Loesser, A Most Remarkable Fella: Frank Loesser and the Guys and Dolls in His Life: A Portrait by His Daughter, Hal Leonard Corporation (2000), →ISBN, p.121:
      My mother was wearing several hats in the early fifties: hostess, scout, wife, and mother.
  3. (figuratively) Any receptacle from which numbers/names are pulled out in a lottery.
    1. (figuratively, by extension) The lottery or draw itself.
      We're both in the hat: let's hope we come up against each other.
  4. (video games) A hat switch.
    • 2002, Ernest Pazera, Focus on SDL, p.139:
      The third type of function allows you to check on the state of the joystick's buttons, axes, hats, and balls.
  5. (typography, nonstandard, rare) The háček symbol.
  6. (programming, informal) The caret symbol ^.
  7. (Internet slang) User rights on a website, such as the right to edit pages others cannot.
  8. (Cambridge University slang, obsolete) A student who is also the son of a nobleman (and so allowed to wear a hat instead of a mortarboard).
    • 1830, Bulwer-Lytton, Edward, chapter 32, in Paul Clifford:
      I knew intimately all the 'Hats' in the University, and I was henceforth looked up to by the 'Caps,' as if my head had gained the height of every hat that I knew.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from hat (noun)
DescendantsEdit
  • Sranan Tongo: ati
TranslationsEdit
See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

hat (third-person singular simple present hats, present participle hatting, simple past and past participle hatted)

  1. (transitive) To place a hat on.
    • 2004, David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas:
      After the maids had hatted and gloved the girls, the carriage was summoned and I was carted around one church after another.
  2. (transitive) To appoint as cardinal.
    • 1929, "Five New Hats," Time, 2 December, 1929, [2]
      It was truly a breathtaking rise. From the quiet school, Pope Pius XI had jumped Father Verdier over the heads of innumerable Bishops, made him Archbishop of Paris. Soon he was to be hatted a Prince of the Church and put in charge of the Cathedral of Notre-Dame.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. (Scotland, Northern England or obsolete) simple past tense of hit
    When I axed him why he hat 'im, he said, "I ne know, I ne know, mate."
ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


CimbrianEdit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. third-person singular present indicative of haban

DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hattr, hǫttr.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hat c (singular definite hatten, plural indefinite hatte)

  1. hat

InflectionEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. Third-person singular present of haben.

HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Hungarian numbers (edit)
60
 ←  5 6 7  → 
    Cardinal: hat
    Nominal: hatos
    Ordinal: hatodik
    Day of month: hatodika
    A.o.: hatodszor, hatodjára
    Adverbial: hatszor
    Multiplier: hatszoros
    Distributive: hatosával
    Collective: mind a hat
    Fractional: hatod
    Number of people: hatan

From Proto-Finno-Ugric *kutte (six). Cognates include Finnish kuusi, Mansi хо̄т (hōt), Khanty хәт (xət).

NumeralEdit

hat

  1. six
DeclensionEdit
Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative hat hatok
accusative hatot hatokat
dative hatnak hatoknak
instrumental hattal hatokkal
causal-final hatért hatokért
translative hattá hatokká
terminative hatig hatokig
essive-formal hatként hatokként
essive-modal
inessive hatban hatokban
superessive haton hatokon
adessive hatnál hatoknál
illative hatba hatokba
sublative hatra hatokra
allative hathoz hatokhoz
elative hatból hatokból
delative hatról hatokról
ablative hattól hatoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
haté hatoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
hatéi hatokéi
Possessive forms of hat
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. hatom hataim
hatjaim
2nd person sing. hatod hataid
hatjaid
3rd person sing. hata
hatja
hatai
hatjai
1st person plural hatunk hataink
hatjaink
2nd person plural hatotok hataitok
hatjaitok
3rd person plural hatuk
hatjuk
hataik
hatjaik
Derived termsEdit
Compound words

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. (intransitive) to take effect, to be effective, to work
    Synonyms: hatásos, működik, beválik
  2. (intransitive) to affect, to have influence, to act (on something -ra/-re)
    Synonyms: kihat, érint, befolyásol
  3. (intransitive) to seem, appear (as something -nak/-nek)
    Synonyms: tűnik, látszik
ConjugationEdit
Derived termsEdit

(With verbal prefixes):

Further readingEdit

  • (six): hat in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.
  • (to take effect): hat in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh: A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962.

InterlingueEdit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. past and passive participle of har

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hat

  1. h-prothesized form of at

VerbEdit

hat

  1. h-prothesized form of at

LuxembourgishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. inflection of hunn:
    1. first/third-person singular preterite indicative
    2. second-person plural preterite indicative

VerbEdit

hat

  1. inflection of haen:
    1. second-person plural present indicative
    2. second-person plural imperative

MaricopaEdit

NounEdit

hat (plural haat)

  1. dog

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English hæt, hætt, from Proto-Germanic *hattuz.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hat (plural hattes or hatten)

  1. A hat or cap; a piece of headgear or headwear.
  2. A helmet; a hat used as armour.
  3. (rare) A circlet or tiara; a ring-shaped piece of headgear.
  4. (rare) A circle of foam or mist.
  5. (rare) A area of hilly woodland.
Related termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English hete, influenced by haten.

NounEdit

hat

  1. Alternative form of hate

North FrisianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Frisian hit.

PronounEdit

hat

  1. it

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nb

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

NounEdit

hat n (definite singular hatet, indefinite plural hat, definite plural hata or hatene)

  1. hatred, hate
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. imperative of hate

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz. Akin to English hate.

NounEdit

hat n (definite singular hatet, indefinite plural hat, definite plural hata)

  1. hatred, hate

Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

hat

  1. imperative of hate

ReferencesEdit


Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *haitaz. Cognate with Old Frisian hēt (West Frisian hjit), Old Saxon hēt, Dutch heet, Old High German heiz (German heiß), Old Norse heitr (Swedish het). Cognate to Albanian ethe (shiver, fiever), dialectal hethe and ith (warmth, body heat), dialectal hith.

AdjectiveEdit

hāt

  1. hot, fierce
    Ðeos wyrt byþ cenned on hatum stowumThis plant is grown in hot places.
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English hātan.

NounEdit

hāt n

  1. a promise

SwedishEdit

 
Swedish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia sv

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse hatr, from Proto-Germanic *hataz.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hat n (uncountable)

  1. hatred, haught

DeclensionEdit

Declension of hat 
Uncountable
Indefinite Definite
Nominative hat hatet
Genitive hats hatets

Related termsEdit


Tok PisinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From English hat.

NounEdit

hat

  1. hat

Etymology 2Edit

From English hard.

AdverbEdit

hat

  1. hard
    • 1989, Buk Baibel long Tok Pisin, Port Moresby: Bible Society of Papua New Guinea, 3:19:
      Na bai yu wok hat tru long kisim kaikai bilong yu na tuhat bai i kamap long pes bilong yu. Na bai yu hatwok oltaim inap yu dai na yu go bek long graun. Long wanem, mi bin wokim yu long graun, na bai yu go bek gen long graun.”
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
Related termsEdit
This entry has fewer than three known examples of actual usage, the minimum considered necessary for clear attestation, and may not be reliable. Tok Pisin is subject to a special exemption for languages with limited documentation. If you speak it, please consider editing this entry or adding citations. See also Help and the Community Portal.

TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Arabic خَطّ(ḵaṭṭ).

NounEdit

hat (definite accusative hatı, plural hatlar)

  1. line
  2. writing

DeclensionEdit

Inflection
Nominative hat
Definite accusative hatı
Singular Plural
Nominative hat hatlar
Definite accusative hatı hatları
Dative hata hatlara
Locative hatta hatlarda
Ablative hattan hatlardan
Genitive hatın hatların

TurkmenEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Arabic خَطّ(ḵaṭṭ).

NounEdit

hat (definite accusative haty, plural hatlar)

  1. letter (written message)