on point



on point ‎(comparative more on point, superlative most on point)

  1. (chiefly US, law, philosophy) Having a direct application to the case or topic under consideration.
    • 1984, Eike-Henner W. Kluge, "Review of Frege and the Philosophy of Mathematics by Michael D. Resnik and Gottlob Frege by Hans D. Sluga," Noûs, vol. 18, no. 2, p. 342:
      His historical discussions always appear on point, well researched, and indicate a great deal of care.
    • 1994, John Kerr, A Most Dangerous Method: The Story of Jung, Freud, and Sabina Spielrein, ISBN 9780679735809, Google preview:
      Eitingon raised Jung's idea of substituting a new complex; Freud did not answer on point, but talked at length about transference.
    • 2004 Oct. 13, Dick Meyer, "Opinion: Bush Did Well, But Kerry Won," CBS News (retrieved 22 June 2012):
      The second question of the night was about the shortage of flu vaccine. Bush gave a fine answer, on point.
  2. (chiefly military) Having taken point; responsible for leading an operation; more generally, deployed and alert.
    • 2003, Aaron Tayler, The DJ Chronicles: A Life Remixed, Port Hole Publications, ISBN 0970027478, chapter 14, page 71:
      Halo interrupted, “We are all dialed in. Music begins in five minutes. Security is on point. Light show is programmed. Do this for me: roll up the road and grab us some smokes at the convenience store across the street. Here's some cash.”

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