osculor

Contents

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From osculum ‎(kiss), from ōs ‎(mouth) +‎ -culum.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

osculor ‎(present infinitive osculārī, perfect active osculātus sum); first conjugation, deponent

  1. I kiss.
  2. I embrace, value.

InflectionEdit

   Conjugation of osculor (first conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present osculor osculāris, osculāre osculātur osculāmur osculāminī osculantur
imperfect osculābar osculābāris, osculābāre osculābātur osculābāmur osculābāminī osculābantur
future osculābor osculāberis, osculābere osculābitur osculābimur osculābiminī osculābuntur
perfect osculātus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect osculātus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect osculātus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present osculer osculēris, osculēre osculētur osculēmur osculēminī osculentur
imperfect osculārer osculārēris, osculārēre osculārētur osculārēmur osculārēminī osculārentur
perfect osculātus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect osculātus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present osculāre osculāminī
future osculātor osculātor osculantor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives osculārī osculātus esse osculātūrus esse osculātum īrī
participles osculāns osculātus osculātūrus osculandus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
osculārī osculandī osculandō osculandum osculātum osculātū

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • osculor” in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879.
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