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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman parlance, parlaunce, from parler (to talk) + -ance.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpɑː.ləns/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpɑɹ.ləns/
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

parlance (countable and uncountable, plural parlances)

  1. A certain way of speaking, of using words, especially when it comes to those with a particular job or interest.
    • 1836, James Fenimore Cooper, Eclipse:
      To my childish fancy, it had seemed an imaginary flag-staff, or, in rustic parlance, the "liberty pole" of some former generation []
    • 1845, Charles Miner, History of Wyoming, Letter IX:
      We approach the contest, still known in the common parlance of the country, as "the first Pennimite War."
    • 1909, William Elliot Griffis, The Story of New Netherland, Chapter 22:
      The tourist's impression of the country to-day is that of a transported Holland, in which the official language is Dutch and the parlance of the people is "taki-taki."
  2. (archaic, rare) Speech, discussion or debate.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

parler +‎ -ance, or from an unattested Latin word.

NounEdit

parlance f (oblique plural parlances, nominative singular parlance, nominative plural parlances)

  1. discussion; debate

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit