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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the phrase jobbe of work (piece of work), of uncertain origin. Perhaps from a variant of Middle English gobbe (mass, lump); or perhaps related to Middle English jobben (to jab, thrust, peck), or Middle English choppe (piece, bargain). More at gob, jab, chop.

Folk etymology linked the word to Job, the biblical character who suffered many misfortunes; for semantic development of misery and labor, compare Vulgar Latin *tripalium (instrument of torture) and its Romance descendants like Spanish trabajo and French travail (whence borrowed into English travail).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

job (plural jobs)

  1. A task.
    I've got a job for you - could you wash the dishes?
    A job half done is hardly done at all.
  2. An economic role for which a person is paid.
    That surgeon has a great job.
    He's been out of a job since being made redundant in January.
    • 2013 August 10, Schumpeter, “Cronies and capitols”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult. Businesspeople have every right to lobby governments, and civil servants to take jobs in the private sector.
    • 2016, VOA Learning English (public domain)
      Here I am at my new job
      (file)
  3. (in noun compounds) Plastic surgery.
    He had had a nose job.
  4. (computing) A task, or series of tasks, carried out in batch mode (especially on a mainframe computer).
  5. (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought): A sudden thrust or stab; a jab.
  6. A public transaction done for private profit; something performed ostensibly as a part of official duty, but really for private gain; a corrupt official business.
  7. Any affair or event which affects one, whether fortunately or unfortunately.
  8. (colloquial) A thing (often used in a vague way to refer to something whose name one cannot recall).
    Pass me that little job with the screw thread on it.

Usage notesEdit

  • Adjectives often applied to "job": easy, hard, poor, good, great, excellent, decent, low-paying, steady, stable, secure, challenging, demanding, rewarding, boring, thankless, stressful, horrible, lousy, satisfying, industrial, educational, academic.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

job (third-person singular simple present jobs, present participle jobbing, simple past and past participle jobbed)

  1. (intransitive) To do odd jobs or occasional work for hire.
    • Moore
      Authors of all work, to job for the season.
  2. (intransitive) To work as a jobber.
  3. (intransitive, professional wrestling slang) To take the loss.
  4. (transitive, trading) To buy and sell for profit, as securities; to speculate in.
  5. (transitive, often with out) To subcontract a project or delivery in small portions to a number of contractors.
    We wanted to sell a turnkey plant, but they jobbed out the contract to small firms.
  6. (intransitive) To seek private gain under pretence of public service; to turn public matters to private advantage.
    • Alexander Pope
      And judges job, and bishops bite the town.
  7. To strike or stab with a pointed instrument.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of L'Estrange to this entry?)
  8. To thrust in, as a pointed instrument.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Moxon to this entry?)
  9. To hire or let in periods of service.
    to job a carriage

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Derived termsEdit

Terms derived from the noun or verb job

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English job.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

job m (plural jobs)

  1. (chiefly Belgium) job
    Synonym: baan

Usage notesEdit

Job is the default word for a job in Belgium. In the Netherlands baan is the default; however, job is sometimes used informally or in certain sectors (e.g. marketing), but it may also be considered pretentious due to an association with yups.


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English job.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

job m or f (plural jobs)

  1. (informal) job (employment role)
  2. (Quebec, Louisiana, informal) work

Usage notesEdit

  • This term is feminine in Quebec and some parts of Louisiana and masculine elsewhere.

SynonymsEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English job.

NounEdit

job m (invariable)

  1. job (employment role, computing task)

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from English job.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

job m (plural jobs)

  1. (computing) job (task carried out in batch mode)