pelisse

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French pelisse, from Latin pellis (skin), from Ancient Greek πέλλα (pélla, skin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

pelisse (plural pelisses)

  1. A fur-lined or fur robe or gown, especially as part of a uniform.
  2. (historical) A silk gown formerly worn by women, often lined or trimmed with fur.
    • 1897, Henry James, What Maisie Knew:
      Mrs. Wix, after Miss Overmore's last demonstration, addressed herself wholly to the little girl [] , drawing from the pocket of her dingy old pelisse a small flat parcel []
  3. An overgarment worn by Victorian children when outside.
    • 1848, William Mzkepeace Thackeray, Vanity Fair, Chapter 11:
      Crawley is made to put on the brightest pea-green in her wardrobe, and my pupils leave off their thick shoes and tight old tartan pelisses, and wear silk stockings and muslin frocks, as fashionable baronets' daughters should.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

NounEdit

pelisse f (plural pelisses)

  1. pelisse

Further readingEdit