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See also: Robe, røbe, robé, robě, and róbě

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EnglishEdit

 
A judge in judicial robes

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English robe, roobe, from Old French robe, robbe, reube (booty, spoils of war, robe, garment), from Frankish *rouba, *rauba (booty, spoils, stolen clothes, literally things taken), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (booty, that which is stripped or carried away), from Proto-Indo-European *rewp- (to tear, peel). Akin to Old High German roup ("booty"; Modern German Raub (robbery, spoils)), Old High German roubōn ("to rob, steal"; Modern German rauben (to rob)), Old English rēaf (spoils, booty, dress, armour, robe, garment), Old English rēafian (to steal, deprive). More at rob, reaf, reave.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

robe (plural robes)

  1. A long loose outer garment, often signifying honorary stature.
    • Shakespeare
      Through tattered clothes small vices do appear; / Robes and furred gowns hide all.
  2. (US) The skin of an animal, especially the bison, dressed with the fur on, and used as a wrap.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

robe (third-person singular simple present robes, present participle robing, simple past and past participle robed)

  1. To clothe someone in a robe.

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrobɛ/
  • Rhymes: -obɛ
  • Hyphenation: ro‧be

NounEdit

robe m

  1. vocative singular of rob

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French robe.

NounEdit

robe f (plural roben or robes, diminutive robetje n)

  1. gown, robe

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old French, from Proto-Germanic *raubō (booty), later "stolen clothing".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

robe f (plural robes)

  1. dress, frock
  2. fur, coat (of an animal)
    Ce cheval a une robe isabelle.
  3. wine's colour

HypernymsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

robe f

  1. plural of roba

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French robe, robbe, reube (booty, spoils of war; robe, garment), from Frankish *rouba, *rauba (booty, spoils, stolen clothes, literally things taken), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (booty, that which is stripped or carried away), from Proto-Indo-European *reup- (to tear, peel).

NounEdit

robe f (plural robes)

  1. (Jersey) dress
  2. (Jersey) robe

SynonymsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *rouba, *rauba (booty, spoils, stolen clothes, literally things taken), from Proto-Germanic *raubō, *raubaz, *raubą (booty, that which is stripped or carried away).

NounEdit

robe f (oblique plural robes, nominative singular robe, nominative plural robes)

  1. booty; spoils (chiefly of war)
  2. piece of clothing
    • circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, Érec et Énide:
      [D]onez li [d]e voz robes que vos avez
      La mellor que vos i savez.
      Give her the clothes that you have
      The best that you know of.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • (fr) Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (robe)

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

robe

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of robar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of robar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of robar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of robar.