See also: Police, poliçe, and policé

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French police, from Latin politia (state, government), from Ancient Greek πολιτεία (politeía). Doublet of policy and polity.

PronunciationEdit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

NounEdit

police pl (normally plural, singular police)

  1. A civil force granted the legal authority for law enforcement and maintaining public order. [from 18th c.]
    Call the police!
    The police operating in New York City operate under the New York City Police Department, several other city agencies and boards, and several public authorities.
  2. (regional, chiefly US, Caribbean, Scotland) A police officer. [from 19th c.]
    • 2006, David Simon, Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets[2], →ISBN, page 440:
      This time it is the worst kind of call a murder police can get.
  3. (figuratively) People who seek to enforce norms or standards.
    • 2016 February 5, “How the circumflex became France's bête noire”, in The Guardian[3]:
      A major drama has broken out in France after the local language police decreed one of their cute little accents to be largely redundant
  4. (military, slang) The duty of cleaning up.
    • 1907, Hearings Before the Committee on Military Affairs, United States Senate, concerning the Affray at Brownsville, Tex. on the Night of August 13 and 14, 1906 (volume 2)
      Q. [] What did you do that day? — A. I was cleaning up around quarters.
      Q. You had been on guard and went on police duty? You were policing, cleaning up around the barracks? — A. Yes, sir.
  5. (obsolete) Policy. [15th-19th c.]
  6. (obsolete) Communal living; civilization. [16th-19th c.]
  7. (now rare, historical) The regulation of a given community or society; administration, law and order etc. [from 17th c.]
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Greta Nation, Penguin 2003, page 218:
      The notion of ‘police’ – that is, rational administration – was seen as a historical force which could bring civilized improvement to societies.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

police (third-person singular simple present polices, present participle policing, simple past and past participle policed)

  1. (transitive) To enforce the law and keep order among (a group).
    Extra security was hired to police the crowd at the big game.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, in The Onion AV Club:
      Smith returns in Men In Black 3 as a veteran agent of a secret organization dedicated to policing the earth’s many extraterrestrials.
    • 2013 August 10, Schumpeter, “Cronies and capitols”, in The Economist, volume 408, number 8848:
      Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult. Businesspeople have every right to lobby governments, and civil servants to take jobs in the private sector. Governments have to find the best people to fill important jobs: there is a limited supply of people who understand the financial system, for example.
  2. (transitive, intransitive, military, slang) To clean up an area.
    • 1900, Association of Military Surgeons of the United States, Proceedings of the eighth annual meeting
      This comes to him through the company housekeeping, for in the field each organization takes care of itself, cooks its own food, makes its own beds, does its own policing (cleaning up); []
    • 1907, Hearings Before the Committee on Military Affairs, United States Senate, concerning the Affray at Brownsville, Tex. on the Night of August 13 and 14, 1906 (volume 2)
      Q. [] What did you do that day? — A. I was cleaning up around quarters.
      Q. You had been on guard and went on police duty? You were policing, cleaning up around the barracks? — A. Yes, sir.
    • 2006, Robert B. Parker, Hundred-Dollar Baby, Putnam, →ISBN, page 275,
      "Fire off several rounds in a residential building and stop to police the brass?"
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To enforce norms or standards upon.
    to police a person's identity

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

police f

  1. shelf (structure)

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin politia (state, government), from Ancient Greek πολιτεία (politeía).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

police f (plural polices)

  1. police
    Fuyez, la police arrive !
    Run, the police are coming!
  2. (typography) fount, font
  3. (Quebec) cop (police officer)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

police

  1. first-person singular present indicative of policer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of policer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of policer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of policer
  5. second-person singular imperative of policer

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin politia.

NounEdit

police f (plural polices)

  1. governance; management
    • 1577, Jean d'Ogerolles, Discours sur la contagion de peste qui a esté ceste presente annee en la ville de Lyon, front cover
      contenant les causes d'icelle, l'ordre, moyen et police tenue pour en purger, nettoyer et delivrer la ville (subheading)
      containing the causes, the order, means and management employed to purge, clean and deliver the city

Related termsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin politia.

NounEdit

police f (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) police

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

police

  1. nominative plural of polica

SlovakEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

police

  1. nominative plural of polica