police

See also: Police, poliçe, and policé

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Middle French police, from Latin politia (state, government), from Ancient Greek πολιτεία (politeia).

PronunciationEdit

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Wikipedia

NounEdit

police (uncountable)

  1. A civil force granted the legal authority to enforce the law and maintain public order. [from 18th c.]
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 18, The China Governess[1]:
      ‘Then the father has a great fight with his terrible conscience,’ said Munday with granite seriousness. ‘Should he make a row with the police […]? Or should he say nothing about it and condone brutality for fear of appearing in the newspapers?
    Call the police!
    The police operating in New York City operate under the New York City Police Department, several other City agencies and boards, and several public authorities.
  2. (regional, chiefly US, Caribbean, Scotland) A police officer. [from 19th c.]
    • 2006, David Simon, Homicide: A Year on the Killing Streets[2], ISBN 0805080759, page 440:
      This time it is the worst kind of call a murder police can get.
  3. (obsolete) Policy. [15th-19th c.]
  4. (obsolete) Communal living; civilization. [16th-19th c.]
  5. (now rare, historical) The regulation of a given community or society; administration, law and order etc. [from 17th c.]
    • 2002, Colin Jones, The Greta Nation, Penguin 2003, p. 218:
      The notion of ‘police’ – that is, rational administration – was seen as a historical force which could bring civilized improvement to societies.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

police (third-person singular simple present polices, present participle policing, simple past and past participle policed)

  1. (transitive) To enforce the law and keep order among (a group).
    Extra security was hired to police the crowd at the big game.
    • 2012 May 24, Nathan Rabin, “Film: Reviews: Men In Black 3”, The Onion AV Club:
      Smith returns in Men In Black 3 as a veteran agent of a secret organization dedicated to policing the earth’s many extraterrestrials.
    • 2013 August 10, Schumpeter, “Cronies and capitols”, The Economist, volume 408, number 8848: 
      Policing the relationship between government and business in a free society is difficult. Businesspeople have every right to lobby governments, and civil servants to take jobs in the private sector. Governments have to find the best people to fill important jobs: there is a limited supply of people who understand the financial system, for example.
  2. (transitive) To patrol an area.
    • 2006, Robert B. Parker, Hundred-Dollar Baby, Putnam, ISBN 0399153764, page 275,
      "Fire off several rounds in a residential building and stop to police the brass?"

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

police f

  1. shelf (structure)

Derived termsEdit

  • polička

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin politia (state, government), from Ancient Greek πόλις (polis, city).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

police f (plural polices)

  1. police
    Fuyez, la police arrive !
    Run, the police are coming!
  2. (typography) fount, font
  3. (Quebec) cop (police officer)

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

police

  1. first-person singular present indicative of policer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of policer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of policer
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of policer
  5. second-person singular imperative of policer

AnagramsEdit


JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

NounEdit

police f (usually uncountable)

  1. police

Serbo-CroatianEdit

NounEdit

police

  1. nominative plural of polica
Last modified on 29 March 2014, at 18:54