point of view

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Calque of French point de vue.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

point of view (plural points of view)

  1. A position from which something is seen; outlook; standpoint.
    From an economist's point of view, business is all about money.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XXII, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, OCLC 4293071:
      From another point of view, it was a place without a soul. The well-to-do had hearts of stone; the rich were brutally bumptious; the Press, the Municipality, all the public men, were ridiculously, vaingloriously self-satisfied.
    • 2008, BioWare, Mass Effect (Science Fiction), Redwood City: Electronic Arts, →ISBN, OCLC 246633669, PC, scene: Protheans: Cipher Codex entry:
      It has been suggested that Prothean data recording is highly dependent on a certain point of view, what Carl Jung described as the collective unconscious. The 'cipher' needed to comprehend the images implanted in Shepard's mind is the cultural knowledge of a Prothean: the archetypes, biological instincts, and common experiences universal to the race.
  2. An attitude, opinion, or set of beliefs.
    His point of view is that there is only one true religion.
  3. (literary theory) The perspective from which a narrative is related.
    The storyline in the film “The Usual Suspects” is presented from the point of view of an unreliable narrator.

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Further readingEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “point of view”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.