opinion

See also: opinión

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English opinion, opinioun, from Anglo-Norman and Middle French opinion, from Latin opīniō, from opīnor (to opine). Displaced native Old English wēna.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /əˈpɪnjən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪnjən
  • Hyphenation: opin‧ion

NounEdit

opinion (plural opinions)

  1. A belief, judgment or perspective that a person has formed, either through objective or subjective reasoning, about a topic, issue, person or thing.
    I would like to know your opinions on the new filing system.
    In my opinion, white chocolate is better than milk chocolate.
    Every man is a fool in some man's opinion.
    We invite you to state your opinions about the suggestions.
    • 1891, Oscar Wilde, The Critic as Artist:
      Truth, in matters of religion, is simply the opinion that has survived.
  2. The judgment or sentiment which the mind forms of persons or things; estimation.
    • c. 1606, William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Macbeth”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene vii], line 32:
      I have bought golden opinions from all sorts of people.
    • 1692–1717, Robert South, Twelve Sermons Preached upon Several Occasions, volume (please specify |volume=I to VI), 6th edition, London: [] J[ames] Bettenham, for Jonah Bowyer, [], published 1727, OCLC 21766567:
      Friendship [] gives a man a peculiar right and claim to the good opinion of his friend.
  3. (obsolete) Favorable estimation; hence, consideration; reputation; fame; public sentiment or esteem.
  4. (obsolete) Obstinacy in holding to one's belief or impression; opiniativeness; conceitedness.
  5. The formal decision, or expression of views, of a judge, an umpire, a doctor, or other party officially called upon to consider and decide upon a matter or point submitted.
  6. (European Union law) a judicial opinion delivered by an Advocate General to the European Court of Justice where he or she proposes a legal solution to the cases for which the court is responsible

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

opinion (third-person singular simple present opinions, present participle opinioning, simple past and past participle opinioned)

  1. (transitive, archaic) To have or express as an opinion.
    • 1658, Sir Thomas Browne, The Graden of Cyrus (Folio Society 2007, p. 166)
      But if (as some opinion) King Ahasuerus were Artaxerxes Mnemon [...], our magnified Cyrus was his second Brother

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • opinion at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • opinion in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • opinion” in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

opinion

  1. accusative singular of opinio

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French opinion, from Latin opīniō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

opinion f (plural opinions)

  1. opinion (thought, estimation)

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin opīniō.

NounEdit

opinion f (plural opinions)

  1. opinion (thought, estimation)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin opīniō, via French opinion

NounEdit

opinion m (definite singular opinionen, indefinite plural opinioner, definite plural opinionene)

  1. (public) opinion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin opīniō, via French opinion

NounEdit

opinion m (definite singular opinionen, indefinite plural opinionar, definite plural opinionane)

  1. (public) opinion

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin opīniō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

opinion f (plural opinions)

  1. opinion
    Synonym: vejaire