See also: poudré

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French poudre, from Latin pulverem, accusative of pulvis (or possibly through a Vulgar Latin form *pŭlvĕra), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *pel- (dust; flour).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pudʁ/
  • (file)

NounEdit

poudre f (plural poudres)

  1. powder
  2. (obsolete) dust

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

All are borrowed.

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French poudre, from Latin pulverem, accusative of pulvis.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpuːdər/, /ˈpuːðər/, /ˈpuːdrə/

NounEdit

poudre (plural poudres)

  1. powder (a collection of particles):
    1. Dust; powder as a waste products or generated from the remains of something.
    2. Ashes; the matter produced by combustion.
    3. Earth, dirt; the particles that compose soil.
    4. Various powders as used in medicine or alchemy.
    5. Powders used for culinary purposes; spices.
    6. (rare) Gunpowder; black powder.
  2. The results of the decomposition of one's corpse.
  3. (rare) A speckling; an stippled pattern.
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

poudre

  1. Alternative form of poudren

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin pulverem, accusative of pulvis. Compare Old Occitan poldra, polvera.

NounEdit

poudre f (oblique plural poudres, nominative singular poudre, nominative plural poudres)

  1. powder
  2. dust

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit