presuppose

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French presupposer, from prae- (before) and supponere (to suppose).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

presuppose (third-person singular simple present presupposes, present participle presupposing, simple past and past participle presupposed)

  1. To assume some truth without proof, usually for the purpose of reaching a conclusion based on that truth.
    • 1962 October, “The Victoria Line was only part of the plan”, in Modern Railways, page 258:
      The Working Party's report to the Minister of Transport was published in 1949. It presupposed the demolition of Blackfriars railway bridge on planning grounds, to meet the requirements of the County of London and City of London Plans; [...]. (There was two railway bridges, one was demolished in 1985.)

TranslationsEdit

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ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

presuppose

  1. third-person singular past historic of presupporre