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See also: primetime and prime-time



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Alternative formsEdit

prime-time, primetime


prime time (uncountable)

  1. (obsolete) Spring.
  2. (obsolete) A new period or time of youthfulness; the beginning of something.
  3. (television, radio) The block of programming on television during the middle of the evening, usually between 19:00 and 23:00
  4. (figuratively) Maturity; the state at which a person or product will be accepted by the mainstream.
    • 2000, Ira Brodsky, Network World, page 18
      It took years longer than proponents had hoped, but wireless data is ready for prime time.
    • 2005, Leanna Stiefel, Measuring School Performance and Efficiency: Implications for Practice and Research, Eye On Education ↑ISBN, page 13
      Can these measures be regarded as useful, promising, or not ready for prime time? We focus only on the utility of these measures for use by policymakers.
    • 2007, John E. Richardson, Annual Editions: Marketing 08/09 ↑ISBN
      Now, as more and more businesses re-orient themselves to serve the consumer, ethnography has entered prime time.
    • 2008, J. Richard Kuzmyak, Forecasting Metropolitan Commercial and Freight Travel, Transportation Research Board ↑ISBN, page 3
      And as with commodity-based models, tour-based models have also not yet reached prime time.



prime time (not comparable)

  1. (television, radio) Showing during prime time.

Derived termsEdit



From English prime time.



prime time m (countable and uncountable, plural prime times)

  1. (usually uncountable) prime time
  2. (Canada, countable) type of cigarillo