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See also: Prime and primé

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French prime, from Latin primus (first), from earlier prīsmos < *prīsemos < Proto-Italic *priisemos, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *per- (beyond, before).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime (not comparable)

  1. First in importance, degree, or rank.
    Our prime concern here is to keep the community safe.
  2. First in time, order, or sequence.
    Both the English and French governments established prime meridians in their capitals.
  3. First in excellence, quality, or value.
    This is a prime location for a bookstore.
  4. (mathematics, lay) Having exactly two integral factors: itself and unity (1 in the case of integers).
    Thirteen is a prime number.
  5. (mathematics, technical) Such that if it divides a product, it divides one of the multiplicands.
  6. (mathematics) Having its complement closed under multiplication: said only of ideals.
  7. Marked or distinguished by the prime symbol.
  8. Early; blooming; being in the first stage.
    • 1667, John Milton, “Book X”, in Paradise Lost. A Poem Written in Ten Books, London: Printed [by Samuel Simmons], and are to be sold by Peter Parker [] [a]nd by Robert Boulter [] [a]nd Matthias Walker, [], OCLC 228722708; republished as Paradise Lost in Ten Books: The Text Exactly Reproduced from the First Edition of 1667: [], London: Basil Montagu Pickering [], 1873, OCLC 230729554:
      , lines 245–8:
      [] His ſtarrie Helme unbuckl’d ſhew’d him prime / In Manhood where Youth ended ; by his ſide / As in a glittering Zodiac hung the Sword, / Satans dire dread, and in his hand the Spear.
  9. (obsolete) Lecherous; lustful; lewd.
SynonymsEdit
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

prime (plural primes)

  1. (historical) The first hour of daylight; the first canonical hour.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 2, Canto 9, p. 314,[1]
      His larum bell might lowd and wyde be hard,
      When cause requyrd, but neuer out of time;
      Early and late it rong, at euening and at prime.
  2. (Christianity) The religious service appointed to this hour.
  3. (obsolete) The early morning generally.
  4. (now rare) The earliest stage of something.
    • 1593, Richard Hooker, Of the Lawes of Ecclesiasticall Politie, London, 1604, Book 1, p. 69,[3]
      To this end we see how quickly sundry artes Mechanical were found out in the very prime of the world.
    • 1645, Edmund Waller, “To a very young Lady” (earlier title: “To my young Lady Lucy Sidney”) in Poems, &c. Written upon Several Occasions, and to Several Persons, London: H. Herringman, 1686, p. 101,[4]
      Hope waits upon the flowry prime,
  5. The most active, thriving, or successful stage or period.
  6. The chief or best individual or part.
    • 1726, Jonathan Swift, “To a Lady, who desired the author to write some verses upon her in the heroic style” in The Works of Dr. Jonathan Swift, London: W. Bowyer et al., Volume 7, p. 396,[7]
      Give no more to ev’ry guest
      Than he’s able to digest:
      Give him always of the prime;
      And but a little at a time.
  7. (music) The first note or tone of a musical scale.
  8. (fencing) The first defensive position, with the sword hand held at head height, and the tip of the sword at head height.
  9. (algebra, number theory) A prime element of a mathematical structure, particularly a prime number.
    • 2013 July-August, Sarah Glaz, “Ode to Prime Numbers”, in American Scientist, volume 101, number 4:
      Some poems, echoing the purpose of early poetic treatises on scientific principles, attempt to elucidate the mathematical concepts that underlie prime numbers. Others play with primes’ cultural associations. Still others derive their structure from mathematical patterns involving primes.
    3 is a prime.
  10. (card games) A four-card hand containing one card of each suit in the game of primero; the opposite of a flush in poker.
  11. (backgammon) Six consecutive blocks, which prevent the opponent's pieces from passing.
    I'm threatening to build a prime here.
  12. The symbol used to indicate feet, minutes, derivation and other measures and mathematical operations.
  13. (chemistry, obsolete) Any number expressing the combining weight or equivalent of any particular element; so called because these numbers were respectively reduced to their lowest relative terms on the fixed standard of hydrogen as 1.
  14. An inch, as composed of twelve seconds in the duodecimal system.
  15. (obsolete) The priming in a flintlock.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, pp. 95–96,[8]
      [] he pull’d the Trigger, but Providence being pleas’d to preserve me for some other Purpose, the Cock snapp’d, and miss’d Fire. Whether the Prime was wet in the Pan, or by what other Miracle it was I escap’d his Fury, I cannot say []
  16. (film) Contraction of prime lens, a film lens
    • Tomlinson, Shawn M. (2015) Going Pro for $200 & How to Choose a Prime Lens, →ISBN: “By the time I shifted to my first autofocus film SLR with the Pentax PZ-10, primes were considered things of the past”
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
  • (algebra: prime element of a mathematical structure): composite
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Related to primage and primus.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

prime (third-person singular simple present primes, present participle priming, simple past and past participle primed)

  1. (transitive) To prepare a mechanism for its main work.
    You'll have to press this button twice to prime the fuel pump.
  2. (transitive) To apply a coat of primer paint to.
    I need to prime these handrails before we can apply the finish coat.
  3. (obsolete, intransitive) To be renewed.
    • 1634, Francis Quarles, “My Soule Hath Desired Thee in the Night”, in Emblemes, London: G. M., published 1635, book III, page 129:
      Nights baſhfull Empreſſe, though ſhe often wayne, / As oft repents her darkneſſe ; primes againe ; / And with her circling Hornes does re-embrace / Her brothers wealth, and orbs her ſilver face.
  4. (intransitive) To serve as priming for the charge of a gun.
  5. (intransitive, of a steam boiler) To work so that foaming occurs from too violent ebullition, which causes water to become mixed with, and be carried along with, the steam that is formed.
  6. To apply priming to (a musket or cannon); to apply a primer to (a metallic cartridge).
  7. To prepare; to make ready; to instruct beforehand; to coach.
    to prime a witness
    The boys are primed for mischief.
  8. (Britain, dialect, obsolete) To trim or prune.
    to prime trees
  9. (mathematics) To mark with a prime mark.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Etymology 3Edit

From French prime (reward, prize, bonus).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prime (plural primes)

  1. (cycling) An intermediate sprint within a race, usually offering a prize and/or points.
    • 1997 Arnie Baker, Smart Cycling: Successful Training and Racing for Riders of All Levels
      Most primes are won with gaps on the field; most sprints are in bunches.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the feminine of Old French prim, prin, from Latin prīmus, from earlier prīsmos < *prīsemos < Proto-Italic *priisemos.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pʁim/
  • (file)
  • (file)

NounEdit

prime f (plural primes)

  1. reward; prize; bonus

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. first

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. feminine plural of primo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NumeralEdit

prīme

  1. vocative masculine singular of prīmus

ReferencesEdit


RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. feminine plural nominative form of prim
  2. feminine plural accusative form of prim
  3. neuter plural nominative form of prim
  4. neuter plural accusative form of prim

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

prime

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of primar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of primar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of primar.

TarantinoEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prime

  1. first