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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French prolixe, from Latin prōlixus (courteous, favorable).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prolix (comparative more prolix, superlative most prolix)

  1. Tediously lengthy; verbose; dwelling on trivial details.
    • 1843, G. C. Leonardo Sismondi., “Bossi—Necrologia”, in The Quarterly Review[1], volume 72, number 144, page 333:
      People who have blamed [Jean Charles Léonard de] Sismondi as unnecessarily prolix cannot have considered the crowd of details presented by the history of Italy.
    • 2007, Nick Cave, We Call Upon The Author:
      Prolix! Prolix! Nothing a pair of scissors can't fix!
  2. (obsolete) Long; having great length.

SynonymsEdit

  • (tediously lengthy): For semantic relationships of this term, see verbose in the Thesaurus.

AntonymsEdit

  • (tediously lengthy): For semantic relationships of this term, see concise in the Thesaurus.

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōlixus (courteous, favorable).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prolix (feminine prolixa, masculine plural prolixos, feminine plural prolixes)

  1. prolix