pronominal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōnōminālis, from Latin prōnōmen, prōnōminis.

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal (comparative more pronominal, superlative most pronominal)

  1. (linguistics, grammar) Of, pertaining to, resembling, or functioning as a pronoun.
    • 2014, James Lambert, “Diachronic stability in Indian English lexis”, in World Englishes, page 120:
      Neither of these pronominal compounds was found in current sources.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

pronominal (plural pronominals)

  1. (grammar) A phrase that acts as a pronoun.

TranslationsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōnōminālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal (masculine and feminine plural pronominals)

  1. (grammar) pronominal

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōnōminālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal (feminine singular pronominale, masculine plural pronominaux, feminine plural pronominales)

  1. pronominal

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōnōminālis.

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal m or f (plural pronominais)

  1. (grammar) pronominal

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal (not comparable)

  1. pronominal

Related termsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōnōminālis.

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal m or f (plural pronominais, not comparable)

  1. (grammar) pronominal

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • pronominal” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin prōnōminālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

pronominal (plural pronominales)

  1. pronominal

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit