See also: proră

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin prōra, From Ancient Greek πρῷρα (prôira), ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *per- (to go forth, to cross). Same source as prua.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈprɔra/, [ˈpr̺ɔː.r̺ä]
  • Hyphenation: pro‧ra

NounEdit

prora f (plural prore)

  1. (literary) bow, bows, prow (of a ship)
    • 1472, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Le Monnier (1994), Canto XXVI, pp. 390-391, vv. 139-141:
      a la quarta levar la poppa in suso ¶ e la prora ire in giù, com'altrui piacque, ¶ infin che 'l mar fu sovra noi richiuso».
      at the fourth time it made the stern uplift ¶ and the prow downward go, as pleased Another, ¶ until the sea above us closed again».

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: proră

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek πρῷρα (prôira), ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *per- (to go forth, to cross).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prōra f (genitive prōrae); first declension

  1. (nautical) prow
    • Vergilius, Aeneis, Book VI
      Obvertunt pelago proras
      They turn their prows to the sea.

DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative prōra prōrae
Genitive prōrae prōrārum
Dative prōrae prōrīs
Accusative prōram prōrās
Ablative prōrā prōrīs
Vocative prōra prōrae

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit