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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
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From Middle French proue, from Genoese Italian prua, proa, from Latin prōra, from Ancient Greek πρῷρα (prôira).

NounEdit

prow (plural prows)

  1. (nautical) The front part of a vessel
    Synonyms: beak, bow, forestem, prore, stem
    • 1674, John Milton, Paradise Lost
      The floating vessel swum / Uplifted, and secure with beaked prow / rode tilting o'er the waves.
    • 1918, Edgar Rice Burroughs, The Land That Time Forgot Chapter IV
      We were already rather close in; but I ordered the U-33's prow turned inshore and we crept slowly along, constantly dipping up the water and tasting it to assure ourselves that we didn't get outside the fresh-water current.
  2. A vessel
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English, from Old French prou, from Late Latin prode; more at proud.

AdjectiveEdit

prow (comparative prower, superlative prowest)

  1. (archaic) Brave, valiant, gallant. [1]
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Merriam Webster’s Online Dictionary – prow [1]

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

prow (plural prows)

  1. Alternative form of proa

AnagramsEdit