See also: Bow

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English bowe, boȝe, from Old English boga, from Proto-Germanic *bugô. Cognate with West Frisian boge, Dutch boog, German Bogen, Danish bue, Norwegian boge, bue, Swedish båge.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
a bow (1)
 
Four different types of bow (3)

bow (plural bows)

  1. A weapon made of a curved piece of wood or other flexible material whose ends are connected by a string, used for shooting arrows.
  2. A curved bend in a rod or planar surface, or in a linear formation such as a river (see oxbow).
  3. A rod with horsehair (or an artificial substitute) stretched between the ends, used for playing various stringed musical instruments.
  4. A stringed instrument (chordophone), consisting of a stick with a single taut cord stretched between the ends, most often played by plucking.
  5. A type of knot with two loops, used to tie together two cords such as shoelaces or apron strings, and frequently used as decoration, such as in gift-wrapping.
  6. Anything bent or curved, such as a rainbow.
  7. The U-shaped piece which goes around the neck of an ox and fastens it to the yoke.
  8. Either of the arms of a pair of spectacles, running from the side of the lens to behind the wearer's ear.
    • 1991, Stephen King, Needful Things:
      [] she kept toying with a pair of old sunglasses which lay beside her on the kitchen table. One of the bows had been mended with adhesive tape, and one of the lenses was cracked.
  9. Any instrument consisting of an elastic rod, with ends connected by a string, employed for giving reciprocating motion to a drill, or for preparing and arranging hair, fur, etc., used by hatters.
  10. (nautical) A crude sort of quadrant formerly used for taking the sun's altitude at sea.
  11. (saddlery) Two pieces of wood which form the arched forward part of a saddletree.
  12. The part of a key that is not inserted into the lock and that is used to turn the key.
    Coordinate term: blade
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. To play music on (a stringed) instrument using a bow.
    The musician bowed his violin expertly.
  2. (intransitive) To become bent or curved.
    The shelf bowed under the weight of the books.
  3. (transitive) To make something bend or curve.
  4. (transitive, figurative) To exercise powerful or controlling influence over; to bend, figuratively; to turn; to incline.
  5. (intransitive) To premiere.
    Cronenberg’s "Cosmopolis" bows in Cannes this week.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English bowen, buwen, buȝen, from Old English būgan, from Proto-Germanic *beuganą, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰūgʰ- (to bend). Cognate with Dutch buigen, German biegen, Danish bue.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

bow (third-person singular simple present bows, present participle bowing, simple past and past participle bowed)

  1. (intransitive) To bend oneself as a gesture of respect or deference.
    • 1900, L. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz
      The soldier now blew upon a green whistle, and at once a young girl, dressed in a pretty green silk gown, entered the room. She had lovely green hair and green eyes, and she bowed low before Dorothy as she said, "Follow me and I will show you your room."
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 4, in Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      I told him about everything I could think of; and what I couldn't think of he did. He asked about six questions during my yarn, but every question had a point to it. At the end he bowed and thanked me once more. As a thanker he was main-truck high; I never see anybody so polite.
    That singer always bows towards her audience for some reason.
  2. (transitive and intransitive) To debut.
    • 2010 (publication date), Kara Krekeler, "Rebuilding the opera house", West End Word, volume 39, number 26, December 22, 2010 – January 11, 2011, page 1:
      SCP recently announced that How the Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical will bow on the newly renovated stage next December.
  3. (intransitive) To defer (to something).
    I bow to your better judgement in the matter.
  4. (transitive) To give a direction, indication, or command to by bowing.
    • 1934, Agatha Christie, chapter 7, in Murder on the Orient Express, London: HarperCollins, published 2017, page 124:
      Poirot rose gallantly, bowed her into the seat opposite him.
    • 1958, Anthony Burgess, The Enemy in the Blanket (The Malayan Trilogy), published 1972, page 302:
      He saw himself, in a smart suit and a songkok, bowed into the opulent suites of Ritzes and Waldorfs and baring, under dark glasses, a hairy chest to a milder sun by a snakeless sea.
HypernymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

bow (plural bows)

  1. A gesture, usually showing respect, made by inclining the head or bending forward at the waist; a reverence
    He made a polite bow as he entered the room.
HypernymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Middle English bowe, bowgh, from Middle Dutch boech and/or Old Norse bógr, both from Proto-Germanic *bōguz, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰus (arm). Cognate with Dutch boeg (bow), Danish bov (bow), Swedish bog (bow). Doublet of bough.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

 
The bow of a ship.

bow (plural bows)

  1. (nautical) The front of a boat or ship.
    • 1907, Harold Bindloss, chapter 6, in The Dust of Conflict[1]:
      The night was considerably clearer than anybody on board her desired when the schooner Ventura headed for the land. It rose in places, black and sharp against the velvety indigo, over her dipping bow, though most of the low littoral was wrapped in obscurity.
  2. (rowing) The rower that sits in the seat closest to the bow of the boat.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
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Usage notesEdit
  • Often used in the plural, the ship being considered to have starboard and port bows, meeting at the stern.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

NounEdit

bow (plural bows)

  1. (obsolete) Alternative spelling of bough
    • 1610–1611, William Shakespeare, “The Tempest”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies: Published According to the True Originall Copies (First Folio), London: Printed by Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act V, scene i], page 17:
      Ariell:
      Where the Bee ſucks, there ſuck I,
      In a Cowslips bell, I lie,
      There I cowch when Owles doe crie,
      On the Batts backe I doe flie
        after Sommer merrily.
      Merrily, merrily, ſhall I liue now
      Vnder the bloſſom that hangs on the Bow.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


VilamovianEdit

 
1. bow

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

bōw f (plural bowa)

  1. woman
  2. wife