See also: Prude, prudě, prüde, and пруде

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French prude, from Old French prude, prode, feminine of prou, prod, prud (good, excellent, brave), from Latin. Related to proud but unrelated to prudent.

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: pro͞od, IPA(key): /pɹuːd/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːd

NounEdit

prude (plural prudes)

  1. A person who is or tries to be excessively proper, especially one who is easily offended by matters of a sexual nature.
    • 1907, E.M. Forster, The Longest Journey, Part I, IV [Uniform ed., p. 62]:
      He became shy. "I hadn't meant to tell you. It's not quite for a lady." For, like most men who are rather animal, he was intellectually a prude.
    • 1991, Robert M. Pirsig, Lila:
      If you didn't go for Lila you're some kind of prissy old prude. If you did go for her you were some kind of dirty old man.

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AdjectiveEdit

prude (comparative more prude, superlative most prude)

  1. Prudish.

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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prude (plural prudes)

  1. prude

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

prude

  1. third-person singular present indicative of prudere

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Old FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

prude

  1. feminine singular of pruz