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EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

radge (comparative more radge, superlative most radge)

  1. (Geordie, Scotland) Violent or crazy.
    • 2016 July 16, Joanna Morris, quoting Phil Stephenson, “Tinder date lands Darlington man in Turkey amid military coup”, in The Northern Echo[1], Darlington, UK:
      We met for the first time at the airport and ended up in Turkey – I’ve done a lot of radged things in my time but nothing like this.
    That fight last night was radge
  2. (Geordie, Gosforth) amazing or stupendous.
    Them burgers in the Brandling Villa are pure radge

NounEdit

radge (plural radges)

  1. (Geordie, Scotland) A fit of rage.
    He hoyed a propa radge when a telt him

VerbEdit

radge (third-person singular simple present radges, present participle radgin, simple past and past participle radged)

  1. (Geordie) To throw a fit of rage.

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • A Dictionary of North East Dialect, Bill Griffiths, 2005, Northumbria University Press, →ISBN

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

radge (plural radges)

  1. (Britain, dialectal) Alternative form of rodge (grey duck)

AnagramsEdit