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EtymologyEdit

From Latin resolutus, past participle of resolvō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɛ.zəˌl(j)uːt/, /ˌɹɛ.zəˈl(j)uːt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uːt

AdjectiveEdit

resolute (comparative more resolute, superlative most resolute)

  1. Firm, unyielding, determined.
    She was resolute in her determination to resist his romantic advances.
    He was resolute in his decision to stay.
    • Shakespeare
      Edward is at hand, / Ready to fight; therefore be resolute.
    • Emily Dickinson, ‘I’m the little “Heart’s Ease”!’ (poem):
      If the Coward Bumble Bee / In his chimney corner stay, / I, must resoluter be!
    • 2011 April 10, Alistair Magowan, “Aston Villa 1 - 0 Newcastle”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Villa had plenty of opportunities to make the game safe after a shaky start and despite not reaching any great heights, they were resolute enough to take control of the game in the second half.
  2. (obsolete) Convinced; satisfied; sure.

Usage notesEdit

  • The one-word comparative form resoluter and superlative form resolutest are both well attested, though not as common as the two-word forms “more resolute” and “most resolute”.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

resolute (plural resolutes)

  1. A determined person; one showing resolution.

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

resolūte

  1. vocative masculine singular of resolūtus

ReferencesEdit