EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish reata, from reatar (to retie). Compare lariat.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

riata (plural riatas)

  1. (US, regional) A lariat or lasso. [from 19th c.]
    • 1920, Peter B. Kyne, The Understanding Heart, Chapter I:
      “You double-crossing devil,” the young man growled. “ [] Hereafter you'll trot ahead of me at the end of a riata, while I keep you on the jump with a four-horse whip. Right now you're scattering my dunnage from hell to breakfast, []
    • 2013, Philipp Meyer, The Son, Simon & Schuster 2014, p. 429:
      A few blocks from the capitol we stripped him, cut off everything hanging between his legs, then fixed him with a riata and dragged him up and down Congress.

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrjata/, [ˈrjat̪a]

NounEdit

riata f (plural riatas)

  1. (El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, colloquial) a beating
  2. (El Salvador, Honduras, colloquial) drunkenness
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:borrachera

Further readingEdit