ricochet

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French ricochet, of uncertain origin.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɹɪkəʃeɪ/, /ˈɹɪkəʃɛt/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪ
  • Hyphenation: ric‧o‧chet

NounEdit

ricochet (plural ricochets)

  1. (military) A method of firing a projectile so that it skips along a surface.
  2. An instance of ricocheting; a glancing rebound.
    • 1970, “Child in Time”, in Deep Purple in Rock, performed by Deep Purple:
      And you've not been hit / By flying lead / You'd better close your eyes / Bow your head / Wait for the ricochet

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ricochet (third-person singular simple present ricochets, present participle ricocheting or ricochetting, simple past and past participle ricocheted or ricochetted)

  1. To rebound off something wildly in a seemingly random direction.
    • #*
      2018 June 24, Sam Wallace, “Harry Kane scores hat-trick as England hit Panama for six to secure World Cup knock-out qualification”, in Telegraph (UK):
      Everything that could go right for England did although they never felt lucky and they chuckled at Kane’s third that ricocheted off his heel while he was looking the other way.
  2. (military) To operate upon by ricochet firing.

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin uncertain. The word first appears in the phrases chanson du/de riochet, fable du ricochet. This is apparently related to other story-titles such as the fable du rouge kokelet; other dialectal terms such as ripoton (duckling) and Norman recoquet (chick) has led to theories that the word originally indicated a "young cock". The sense-development is unclear.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

ricochet m (plural ricochets)

  1. rebound; ricochet
  2. (games) ducks and drakes

Further readingEdit