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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English reuþe, ruthe, reuthe, rewthe, reowthe, corresponding to rue +‎ -th, perhaps after early Scandinavian (compare Old Norse hrygð, hryggð (ruth, sorrow)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ruth (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Sorrow for the misery of another; pity, compassion; mercy. [from 13th c.]
  2. (now rare) Repentance; regret; remorse. [from 13th c.]
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XLIV, 2005, The Works of A. E. Housman [1994, The Collected Poems of A. E. Housman], page 61,
      Now to your grave shall friend and stranger / With ruth and some with envy come [].
    • ~1937, J. R. R. Tolkien, The Fall of Arthur
      He mourned too late
      In ruth for the rending of the Round Table.
  3. (obsolete) Sorrow; misery; distress. [13th-19th c.][1]
  4. (obsolete) Something which causes regret or sorrow; a pitiful sight. [13th-17th c.]

Derived termsEdit

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ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit