See also: Hurt and húrt

English edit

 
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Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English hurten, hirten, hertan (to injure, scathe, knock together), from Old Northern French hurter ("to ram into, strike, collide with"; > Modern French heurter), perhaps from Frankish *hūrt (a battering ram), cognate with Welsh hwrdd (ram) and Cornish hordh (ram). Compare Proto-Germanic *hrūtaną, *hreutaną (to fall, beat), from Proto-Indo-European *krew- (to fall, beat, smash, strike, break); however, the earliest instances of the verb in Middle English are as old as those found in Old French, which leads to the possibility that the Middle English word may instead be a reflex of an unrecorded Old English *hyrtan, which later merged with the Old French verb. Germanic cognates include Dutch horten (to push against, strike), Middle Low German hurten (to run at, collide with), Middle High German hurten (to push, bump, attack, storm, invade), Old Norse hrútr (battering ram).

Alternate etymology traces Old Northern French hurter rather to Old Norse hrútr (ram (male sheep)), lengthened-grade variant of hjǫrtr (stag),[1] from Proto-Germanic *herutuz, *herutaz (hart, male deer), which would relate it to English hart (male deer). See hart.

Verb edit

hurt (third-person singular simple present hurts, present participle hurting, simple past and past participle hurt)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (a person or animal) physical pain and/or injury.
    If anybody hurts my little brother, I will get upset.
    This injection might hurt a little.
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To cause (somebody) emotional pain.
    He was deeply hurt he hadn’t been invited.
    The insult hurt.
  3. (intransitive, stative) To be painful.
    Does your leg still hurt? / It is starting to feel better.
  4. (transitive, intransitive) To damage, harm, impair, undermine, impede.
    This latest gaffe hurts the legislator’s reelection prospects still further.
    Copying and pasting identical portions of source code hurts maintainability, because the programmer has to keep all those copies synchronized.
    It wouldn't hurt to check the weather forecast and find out if it's going to rain.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
See also edit

Adjective edit

hurt (comparative more hurt, superlative most hurt)

  1. Wounded, physically injured.
  2. Pained.
Synonyms edit
Derived terms edit
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Noun edit

hurt (plural hurts)

  1. An emotional or psychological humiliation or bad experience.
    how to overcome old hurts of the past
  2. (archaic) A bodily injury causing pain; a wound or bruise.
  3. (archaic) Injury; damage; detriment; harm
  4. (engineering) A band on a trip hammer's helve, bearing the trunnions.
  5. A husk.
Derived terms edit
Related terms edit
Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ D.Q. Adams, Encyclopedia of Indo-European Culture, s.v. "horn" (London: Fitzroy-Dearborn, 1999), 273.

Etymology 2 edit

Unclear. Suggestions include: from its resemblance to a blue hurtleberry, or from French heurt (a blow, leaving a blue bruise: compare the theories about golpe (purple roundel)).

Noun edit

hurt (plural hurts)

  1. (heraldry) A roundel azure (blue circular spot).
Translations edit

See also edit

metals main colours less common colours
tincture or argent gules azure sable vert purpure tenné orange sanguine
depiction                    
roundel (in parentheses: semé):  
bezant (bezanty)
 
plate (platy)
 
torteau (tortelly)
 
hurt (hurty)
 
pellet (pellety), ogress
 
pomme

 
golpe (golpy)
 
orange (semé of oranges)
 
guze (semé of guzes)
goutte (noun) / gutty (adj) thereof:  
(goutte / gutty) d'or (of gold)
 
d'eau (of water)
 
de sang (of blood)
 
de larmes (of tears)
 
de poix

(of pitch)
 
d'huile / d'olive (olive oil)
 



special roundel furs additional, uncommon tinctures:
tincture fountain, syke: barry wavy argent and azure ermine ermines, counter-ermine erminois pean vair counter-vair potent counter-potent bleu celeste, brunâtre, carnation, cendrée (iron, steel, acier), copper, murrey
depiction                  

Anagrams edit

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

From English hurt.

Pronunciation edit


Verb edit

hurt

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to hurt someone emotionally

Adjective edit

hurt (Hong Kong Cantonese)

  1. causing emotional hurt or damage
  2. (of person) emotionally hurt

German edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

hurt

  1. inflection of huren:
    1. third-person singular present
    2. second-person plural present
    3. plural imperative

Middle English edit

Etymology 1 edit

Either borrowed from Old French hurt or a back-formation from hurten.

Alternative forms edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hurt (plural hurtes)

  1. Injury, harm or damage; that which is detrimental:
    1. A wound or disease; damage to one's body.
    2. Monetary loss; damage to one's finances.
    3. (law) A transgression; the act of violating.
    4. (rare) Spiritual damage.
  2. (rare) A blunder or that which causes one.
  3. (rare) Sadness, distress, confusion.
Descendants edit
  • English: hurt
  • Scots: hurt
  • Welsh: hurt
References edit

Etymology 2 edit

Verb edit

hurt

  1. Alternative form of hurten

Polish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Middle High German hurt.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

hurt m inan

  1. wholesale
    Coordinate term: detal

Declension edit

Derived terms edit

adjective
nouns

Descendants edit

Further reading edit

  • hurt in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • hurt in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Welsh edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English hurt.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

hurt (feminine singular hurt, plural hurtion, equative hurted, comparative hurtach, superlative hurtaf, not mutable)

  1. silly, stupid, dull obtuse, foolish
    Synonyms: twp, dwl, pŵl, pendew

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

hurt m (plural hurtion or hurtiaid or hurtod, not mutable)

  1. (archaic) blockhead, dullard
    Synonyms: hurtyn, dylyn

Mutation edit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
hurt unchanged unchanged unchanged

References edit

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “hurt”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies