EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English saiden, equivalent to said +‎ -en.

VerbEdit

saiden

  1. (obsolete) plural simple past of say
    • 1449, Margaret Paston, The Paston Letters:
      It was done me to weet that divers of the Lord Moleyns' men saiden if they might get me they should steal me and keep me within the castle, and then they said that ye should fetch me out; and they saiden it should been but a little heart-burning to you.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book I:
      and letters there were wryten in gold aboute the swerd that saiden thus / who so pulleth oute this swerd of this stone and anuyld / is rightwys kynge borne of all Enlond
    • c. 1605, William Bedell, The Shepherd's Tale of the Pouder-Plott
      Ne wish not (as by my counsell) to heare / The fearfull words, which they saiden there;
    • 1614, William Browne, The Shepheards Pipe. The First Eclogue
      Walking so, two men came him ageine, / And saiden thus: deare friend, we you pray

AnagramsEdit


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

saiden

  1. Rōmaji transcription of さいでん

Tok PisinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English sergeant.

NounEdit

saiden

  1. sergeant