See also: sáið, Said, Saïd, Säid, and -said

English edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English seide (preterite) and seid, iseid (past participle), from Old English sǣde, sæġde (preterite) and ġesæġd (past participle), equivalent to say +‎ -ed.

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

said

  1. simple past and past participle of say

Adjective edit

said (not comparable)

  1. Mentioned earlier; aforesaid.
    The said party has denied the charges.
    • 1951 February, Michael Robbins, “Sir Walter Scott and Two Early Railway Schemes”, in Railway Magazine, page 90, words written by Scott:
      How nicely we could manage without the said railway, now the great hobby of our Teviotdale lairds, if we could by any process of conjuration waft to Abbotsford some of the coal and lime from Lochore...

Translations edit

Determiner edit

said

  1. Mentioned earlier; aforesaid.
    Said party has denied the charges.

Translations edit

References edit

  1. ^ Bingham, Caleb (1808), “Improprieties in Pronunciation, common among the people of New-England”, in The Child's Companion; Being a Conciſe Spelling-book [] [1], 12th edition, Boston: Manning & Loring, →OCLC, page 75.

Anagrams edit

Estonian edit

Verb edit

said

  1. inflection of saama:
    1. second-person singular past indicative
    2. third-person plural past indicative

Middle English edit

Verb edit

said

  1. Alternative form of seide
    • 1470–1485 (date produced), Thomas Malory, “Capitulum ij”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book II, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, →OCLC, leaf 39, verso; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, →OCLC, page 78, lines 32–35:
      god thanke your hyhenes ſaid Balen / your bounte and hyhenes may no man preyſe half to the valewe / but at this tyme I muſt nedes departe / byſechyng yow alwey of your good grace /
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)

Romansch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis (perishing, decrease).

Noun edit

said f

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) thirst

Tagalog edit

Pronunciation edit

  • Hyphenation: sa‧id
  • IPA(key): /saˈʔid/, [sɐˈʔid]

Adjective edit

saíd (Baybayin spelling ᜐᜁᜇ᜔)

  1. consumed; with everything used up; exhausted
    Synonym: ubos

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

saíd (Baybayin spelling ᜐᜁᜇ᜔)

  1. consumption of everything on hand
    Synonyms: ubos, pag-ubos, pagkaubos
  2. state of having nothing left