See also: sáið, Said, Saïd, and Säid

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English seide (preterite) and seid, iseid (past participle), from Old English sǣde, sæġde (preterite) and ġesæġd (past participle), equivalent to say +‎ -ed.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

said

  1. simple past tense and past participle of say

AdjectiveEdit

said (not comparable)

  1. Mentioned earlier; aforesaid.
    The said party has denied the charges.

TranslationsEdit

DeterminerEdit

said

  1. Mentioned earlier; aforesaid.
    Said party has denied the charges.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

  • Said for proper noun sense

AnagramsEdit


EstonianEdit

VerbEdit

said

  1. Second-person singular past form of saama.
  2. Third-person plural past form of saama.

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

said

  1. Alternative form of seide
    • a. 1472, Thomas Malory, “Capitulum ij”, in [Le Morte Darthur], book II, [London: [] by William Caxton], published 31 July 1485, OCLC 71490786, leaf 39, verso; republished as H[einrich] Oskar Sommer, editor, Le Morte Darthur [], London: David Nutt, [], 1889, OCLC 890162034, lines 32–35, page 78:
      god thanke your hyhenes ſaid Balen / your bounte and hyhenes may no man preyſe half to the valewe / but at this tyme I muſt nedes departe / byſechyng yow alwey of your good grace /
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sitis, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰgʷʰítis (perishing, decrease).

NounEdit

said f

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) thirst