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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English, from Old French seisir (to put in possession of", "to take possession of), from Late Latin sacīre, from Frankish *sakjan (to sue, bring a legal charge against), from Proto-Germanic *sakōną (to charge, seek legal action against), from Proto-Indo-European *sāg(')- (to track). Cognate with Old High German sahhan (to argue, scold), Old English sacian (to strive, contend). More at sake.

VerbEdit

seise (third-person singular simple present seises, present participle seising, simple past and past participle seised)

  1. (transitive, law) To vest ownership of a freehold estate in (someone).
    • 1997, Nigel Saul, The Oxford illustrated history of medieval England‎, page 74:
      There a baron was created and seised by the king in a single act. His tenure was a function of his personal relationship with his lord king.
  2. (transitive, with of, law) To put in possession.
    • 1878, Joshua Williams, The Seisin of the Freehold‎, page 55:
      He then died intestate; and I observed that his heir-at-law was not actually seised of Whiteacre, the possession of which became vacant on his ancestor's death
    • 2011, Article 3 section 7, Regulation (EU) No 182/2011 of the European Parliament and of the Council of 16 February 2011, Official Journal of the European Union L 55/15
      Where the appeal committee is seised, it shall meet at the earliest 14 days, except in duly justified cases, and at the latest 6 weeks, after the date of referral.
  3. (dated) To seize.
  This entry needs quotations to illustrate usage. If you come across any interesting, durably archived quotes then please add them!
Particularly: “When did this go out of date as a spelling of seize?”

Usage notesEdit

  • Usually used in passive.

SynonymsEdit

  • ((with of) to put in possession): possess

AnagramsEdit


IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish seise, from Old Norse sessi.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

seise m (genitive singular seise, nominative plural seisí)

  1. companion, comrade

DeclensionEdit

MutationEdit

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
seise sheise
after an, tseise
not applicable
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

seise

  1. Alternative form of seisen

Old IrishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old Norse sessi.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

seise m

  1. companion

InflectionEdit

Masculine io-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit