See also: Sake, saké, and sa kê

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sake ‎(sake, cause), from Old English sacu ‎(cause, lawsuit, legal action, complaint, issue, dispute), from Proto-Germanic *sakō ‎(affair, thing, charge, accusation, matter), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₂g- ‎(to investigate). Akin to West Frisian saak, Low German Saak, Dutch zaak ‎(matter; cause; business), German Sache ‎(thing; matter; cause; legal cause), Danish sag, Swedish sak, Gothic 𐍃𐌰𐌺𐌾𐍉 ‎(sakjo, dispute, argument), Old English sōcn ‎(inquiry, prosecution), Old English sēcan ‎(to seek). More at soke, soken, seek.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sake ‎(plural sakes)

  1. Cause, interest or account.
    • For the sake of argument
  2. Purpose or end; reason.
    • For old times' sake
  3. The benefit or regard of someone or something.
    • 1897, Winston Churchill, chapter 1, in The Celebrity[1]:
      When I gave a dinner there was generally a cover laid for him. I liked the man for his own sake, and even had he promised to turn out a celebrity it would have had no weight with me.
    • 2005, Plato, Sophist. Translation by Lesley Brown. 242a-b.
      But it will be for your sake that we'll undertake to refute this thesis, []
  4. (obsolete except in phrases) Contention, strife; guilt, sin, accusation or charge.
    • And unto Adam He said, Because thou hast hearkened unto the voice of thy wife, and hast eaten of the tree, of which I commanded thee, saying, Thou shalt not eat of it: cursed is the ground for thy sake; in sorrow shalt thou eat of it all the days of thy life. — Genesis 3:17
Usage notesEdit
  • The word sake is generally used in constructions of the form "for X's sake" or "for the sake of X", where X is a noun (see the quotations above, for sake of, and for the sake of).
  • Garner's Modern American Usage notes it is common to write an apostrophe rather than apostrophe–ess in this construction when the noun ends in an /s/ or /z/ sound: for appearance' sake, for goodness' sake.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

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Wikipedia

From Japanese ‎(さけ, sake), any alcoholic drink.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sake ‎(countable and uncountable, plural sakes)

  1. (countable and uncountable) Rice wine, a Japanese alcoholic beverage made from rice.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

StatisticsEdit

Most common English words before 1923: wouldn't · success · instance · #906: sake · justice · offer · promise

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

NounEdit

sake

  1. sake (Japanese rice wine)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of sake (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative sake saket
genitive saken sakejen
partitive sakea sakeja
illative sakeen sakeihin
singular plural
nominative sake saket
accusative nom. sake saket
gen. saken
genitive saken sakejen
sakeinrare
partitive sakea sakeja
inessive sakessa sakeissa
elative sakesta sakeista
illative sakeen sakeihin
adessive sakella sakeilla
ablative sakelta sakeilta
allative sakelle sakeille
essive sakena sakeina
translative sakeksi sakeiksi
instructive sakein
abessive saketta sakeitta
comitative sakeineen

HausaEdit

NounEdit

sàkē m

  1. slackness

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

sake

  1. rōmaji reading of さけ
  2. rōmaji reading of サケ

PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Japanese (sake), any alcoholic drink.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sake n ‎(indeclinable)

  1. sake

PortugueseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Japanese (sake), any alcoholic drink.

NounEdit

sake m (plural sakes)

  1. sake, Japanese rice wine

QuotationsEdit

For usage examples of this term, see Citations:saquê.


SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Japanese (sake), any alcoholic drink.

NounEdit

sake m ‎(plural sakes)

  1. sake, Japanese rice wine
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