EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French serein. Doublet of serene.

NounEdit

serein (uncountable)

  1. Light rainfall from a cloudless sky after sunset.
    • 2000, Raphael Confiant, Mamzelle Dragonfly:
      "She must have caught a chill from the serein, that's all!"

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French serein, probably from seri (calm, mild), serrit (with a change of suffix influenced by Latin serēnus), from a verb deriving from Latin serescō, serēscere (grow dry), itself from or related to serēnus (cloudless), by extension "calm, peaceful".

AdjectiveEdit

serein (feminine singular sereine, masculine plural sereins, feminine plural sereines)

  1. (of sky) unclouded, clear
  2. (figuratively) serene, calm, tranquil
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Either from Latin serenum (good weather), or from Old French serein (evening), from Latin serum.

NounEdit

serein m (plural sereins)

  1. (literary or regional) serein

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From seri (calm, mild), serrit (with a change of suffix influenced by Latin serēnus), from a verb deriving from Latin serescō, serēscere (grow dry), itself from or related to serēnus (cloudless), by extension "calm, peaceful".

AdjectiveEdit

serein m (oblique and nominative feminine singular sereine)

  1. serene, calm, tranquil

DescendantsEdit

  • French: serein

Etymology 2Edit

From a derivative of Latin serum.

NounEdit

serein m (oblique plural sereinz, nominative singular sereinz, nominative plural serein)

  1. evening

DescendantsEdit