sirene

See also: Sirene and sirène

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Bulgarian сирене ‎(sirene), from Proto-Slavic, from Proto-Indo-European *suros, whence also English sour, German sauer.

NounEdit

sirene

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Wikipedia

  1. (uncommon) A slightly crumbly brine cheese made of cow-, sheep-, and/or goat-milk, similar to feta, which is popular in the Balkan peninsula.
    • 2006, M. H. Wolfe, Gone Away, page 65:
      [] then the potato pieces were layered on top and the mess was doused with olive oil and spices and cooked for an hour. Vlado made a tomato salad, also, with sirene cheese.
    • 2008, Martin Miller-Yianni, Simple Treasures in Bulgaria, page 209:
      My curiosity was now satisfied: nothing, other than potatoes, bread, garlic and sirene cheese.
    • 2011, Ken Albala, Food Cultures of the World Encyclopedia, page 66:
      A strudel-like banitsa (pastry) is eaten, which is an interlayering of sirene cheese with phyllo pastry—though it may also contain leeks or spinach []

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

sirene ‎(plural sirenes or sirenæ)

  1. (possibly dated) Alternative spelling of siren

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch sirena, serene, from Old French sereine, from Late Latin sirēna, Latin Sīrēn, from Ancient Greek Σειρήν ‎(Seirḗn).

NounEdit

sirene f ‎(plural sirenen or sirenes, diminutive sirenetje n)

  1. A siren, a dangerous nymph of Greek mythology, luring passers-by using an irresistible song
  2. (figuratively) A seductive but dangerous female
  3. (plural sirenes) A siren, a noisy warning device

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

sirene f

  1. plural of sirena

AnagramsEdit


PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

sirene f (plural sirenes)

  1. Alternative form of sirena (alarm)
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