See also: Serum and sérum

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Latin serum (whey). Cognates: French sérum, Spanish suero, Italian siere, siero, Portuguese soro.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serum (plural serums or sera)

  1. The clear yellowish liquid obtained upon separating whole blood into its solid and liquid components after it has been allowed to clot. Also called blood serum.
  2. Blood serum from the tissues of immunized animals, containing antibodies and used to transfer immunity to another individual, called antiserum.
  3. A watery liquid from animal tissue, especially one that moistens the surface of serous membranes or that is exuded by such membranes when they become inflamed, such as in edema or a blister.
  4. The watery portion of certain animal fluids, as blood, milk, etc; whey.
  5. (skincare) An intensive moisturising product to be applied after cleansing but before a general moisturiser.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Latin serum. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈseː.rʏm/, [ˈsɪː.rʏm]
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: se‧rum

NounEdit

serum n (plural sera or serums)

  1. blood serum

Derived termsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Indo-European *ser- (to flow, run); see also Sanskrit सर (sara, flowing), Sanskrit सार (sā́ra, curd, cream), Sanskrit सारण (sāraṇa, flowing, buttermilk), and Ancient Greek ὁρός (horós, whey, curd, semen).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

serum n (genitive serī); second declension

  1. whey
    • c. 37 BCE – 30 BCE, Virgil, Georgicon 3.404–406:
      Nec tibi cūra canum fuerit postrēma, sed ūnā
      vēlōcis Spartae catulōs ācremque Molossum
      pāsce serō pinguī.
      Nor let the concern for your dogs be the last, but in the same way
      the brave Molossan and the whelps of the swift Spartan
      feed with fat whey.
    • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 28.130:
      Būbulī serum orthopnoicīs prōdest ante cētera additō nāsturtiō.
      Whey of cows is more beneficial to asthmatics than others when cress is added to it.
  2. (by extension) some other watery liquid
    • c. 84 BCE – 54 BCE, Catullus, Carmina 80:
      Quid dīcam, Gellī, quārē rosea ista labella
           hībernā fīant candidiōra nive,
      māne domō cum exīs et cum tē octāva quiēte
           ē mollī longō suscitat hōra diē?
      Nesciŏquid certest: an vērē fāma susurrat
           grandia tē mediī tenta vorāre virī?
      Sīc certest: clāmant Victōris rupta miselli
           īlia, et ēmulsō barba notāta serō.
      What shall I say, Gellius, how these rosy lips
           are whiter than wintery snow,
      when you walk out of the house when the eighth hour
           rouses you from soft rest in the long day?
      Something's sure: perhaps your reputation whispers truthfully
           that you devour the large protuberance of a man's middle?
      So is it certain: thus the broken loins of the poor Victor
           cry, and the beard marked with the milked-out semen.
DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (neuter).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative serum sera
Genitive serī serōrum
Dative serō serīs
Accusative serum sera
Ablative serō serīs
Vocative serum sera
DescendantsEdit
  • Aromanian: dzãr
  • English: serum
  • French: sérum
  • Galician: soro
  • German: Serum

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

sērum

  1. nominative neuter singular of sērus

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

VerbEdit

serum

  1. first-person plural past indicative active of

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin serum (whey).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sěːrum/
  • Hyphenation: se‧rum

NounEdit

sérum m (Cyrillic spelling се́рум)

  1. serum

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

NounEdit

serum m (plural serums)

  1. serum