sesterce

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin sēstertius (two-and-a-half (asses)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sesterce (plural sesterces)

  1. A sestertius.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 3, member 3:
      Nonius the senator hath a purple coat as stiff with jewels as his mind is full of vices; rings on his fingers worth 20,000 sesterces []
    • 1985, Anthony Burgess, Kingdom of the Wicked:
      For him I must convert one of my sheep or goats to sesterces and slaughter another for his entertainment.

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FrenchEdit

NounEdit

sesterce m (plural sesterces)

  1. sestertius (Roman coin)