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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

 
Signage (sense 1) of tour agencies at Mount Fuji, Japan

From sign +‎ -age.[1]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

signage (usually uncountable, plural signages)

  1. (uncountable) Signs, particularly those imparting commercial, directional, or road traffic information, taken collectively.
    The signage at the airport is designed to point the way clearly to important locations.
    • 1962, J. F. McLaughlin, editor, Proceedings of the 48th Annual Road School: Held at Purdue University, March 26–29, 1962 (Engineering Bulletin; Engineering Extension Series (Purdue University, Department of Engineering Extension); no. 111), Lafayette, Ind.: Purdue University, OCLC 24481598, page 196:
      Uniformity must be paramount in all signage and markings and is the only sound basis from which the job of traffic control can be started on any highway system.
    • 1973, Bulletin, volume 48, Detroit, Mich.: Michigan Society of Architects, OCLC 6374206, page 51, column 2:
      Early involvement with a signage designer can often assist the architect and the owner to identify problems in directional or informational signage that may not have been considered.
    • 1995 May, Kate W. Ragsdale, compiler, Effective Library Signage (Systems and Procedures Exchange Center Flyer; 208), [Washington, D.C.]: Office of Management Services, Association of Research Libraries, ISSN 0160-3582, OCLC 60255927, page 1:
      Perhaps no aspect of library design is as vital to the success of library users as is effective signage, and certainly few other aspects are as perplexing for library planners. [...] Librarians often cannot rely on architects and interior designers to plan effective signage and must address this feature of library building design on their own.
    • 2003 January 3, Martin Waller, “Jarvis chief aims to lift siege of Paris”, in The Times[1], London: News UK, ISSN 0140-0460, OCLC 909100542:
      If you try to push more and more traffic on to limited numbers of roads you require more signage, more safety measures, bus lanes, cycle lanes and so on.
    • 2008, Jimmy Schaeffler, “The Big Picture: An Overview of Digital Signage”, in Digital Signage: Software, Networks, Advertising, and Displays: A Primer for Understanding the Business (NAB Executive Technology Briefings), Burlington, Mass.; Oxford, Oxfordshire: Focal Press, →ISBN, page 25:
      [I]t is critical for today's advertisers to realize how different digital signage is today from traditional advertising, be it the difference between static signage and digital content on digital screens, on one hand, or the difference between a traditional broadcast TV ad and a digital signage ad, on the other.
    • 2016, Charles Husband; Yunis Alam; Jörg Hüttermann; Joanna Fomina, “Walking Manningham: Streetscapes, Soundscapes and the Semiotics of the Physical Environment”, in Lived Diversities: Space, Place and Identities in the Multi-ethnic City, Bristol; Chicago, Ill.: Policy Press, →ISBN, page 66:
      Passing through Manningham, whether on foot or by car, there is one aspect of the streetscape that would signal that you are in an area that is, in British terms, 'multi-ethnic', and that is the signage above the shops. [...] [T]here is also specific signage signalling the Muslim nature of some of the properties. Signage, pointing out that this is a Muslim bookshop or that this is a halal butcher, indicates the religious identities that are the primary target of these shops.
  2. (countable, chiefly India, elsewhere regarded as nonstandard) A sign, a signboard.
    • 2008 June, “Institutional, Governance and Policy Framework for Tourism Development in the Islands”, in Rethink Tourism in the Andamans: Towards Building a Base for Sustainable Tourism, Bangalore, Karnataka: EQUATIONS [Equitable Tourism Options], section 5.1.2.2 (Department of Environment and Forests), page 78:
      [T]he department is basically involved in providing basic amenities and the minimum requirements such as clearing trekking tracks, providing signages, basic accommodation or tents and so on.
    • 2009, K. V. S. Madaan, “Store Layout, Design and Visual Merchandising”, in Fundamentals of Retailing (Retail Education), New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Education, →ISBN, page 203:
      External signages invite customers from different distances. Main signage makes appeal to customers approaching store from a distance of 170–180 feet, and the storefront signages makes impact from a distance of 60–70 feet.
    • 2010, Swati Bhalla; Anuraag S., “Part 2: Display Basics”, in Visual Merchandising (Retail Education), New Delhi: Tata McGraw Hill Education, →ISBN, page 44:
      From 'parking' to 'exit' or 'washrooms' to 'please pay here' – a signage is at every retail point.
    • 2012, J. L. Dobias, Cripple Mode: Hot Electric, [Bloomington, Ind.]: Xlibris, →ISBN, page 612:
      We arrive at a place which has a signage with archaic lettering. It says "Twenty Thousand Leagues," and in simple lettering below, it says "Fine dining."
    • 2016, Madhu Gurung, “Bajai”, in The Keeper of Memories, Noida, India: HarperCollins Publishers, →ISBN:
      When he was old enough to read, he saw signages outside beautiful buildings: 'Indians and dogs not allowed.'

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